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25

I've seen TDD/BDD/ATDD used interchangeably with Scrum/Kanban/Agile, so the confusion is understandable. Here's my take on the differences: Waterfall is a software development methodology where each kind of development activity happens in a separate phase (requirements gathering, design, development, testing...). Typically, waterfall projects work best ...


17

This is very common. There are basically 3 parts to the problem: Measure. Track stats to know when the backlog is getting worse or improving, week to week Identify. Figure out what things you need to change to stop making it worse week to week Cleanup. Clean up the backlog you created, bit by bit I'll focus on part 3 - the cleanup - ...


12

In addition to Michael Durrant's excellent answer and the equally good comments, I'd suggest you consider a few things: If you have not already done so, devote some time to analysis of your bug backlog. You will probably find some combination of the following things: The bugs cluster in certain areas of the application. These will typically be the areas ...


7

When working with agile (or any methodology) I would suggest making your testers part of the team, rather having a separate QA team which is isolated from all the work. (This also means sitting the testers with the developers if you are in the same office.) In your points above you have listed a lot of tasks, these tasks are not the sole responsibility of ...


7

Latent Bug : A latent bug is a bug which is present in the system from previous iterations or release (in your scenario Sprint 1). They are either low priority bugs, which either went undetected or were not reported. Here is a good description : What is a latent bug? Golden Bug : If a bug happens to appear, in every iteration or release, affecting the ...


6

The short version: regardless of the development methodology, your role is to provide information about the overall quality of the application. You do that via testing anything that isn't included in the developer-maintained automation, and reviewing the developer-maintained automation. The long version: This question and its answers is a good starting ...


6

Kanban and Scrum are Agile process frameworks and therefor have short iterative development cycles as compared to the longer separate phases of waterfall projects. Agile projects focus on getting a working product in short iterations, each iteration should deliver a piece of deploy-able product. BDD, TDD and ATDD are not development methodologies and can be ...


4

I'm going to answer the first two points because I think the other two should be put as separate questions instead. What are the types of testing that can be conducted on first build which was released in first sprint in agile development model? There is no specific check-list. It depends solely on the architecture and complexity of the project. Team ...


4

Kate's answer is great, but I want to throw in my 2 cents for differentiating TDD/BDD/ATDD. TDD is writing tests first and letting those tests drive the development of your application. This introduces the idea of Red/Green/Refactor. The basic process is to: Write a failing test Make the test pass with application code Refactor the application code for ...


4

Project Management Institute is one of the most well-known. More at https://www.pmi.org/certification/agile-management-acp.aspx Another leader is: https://www.scrumalliance.org/certifications which breaks out various roles including developer A personal note is that in my experience this certifications will make you entry-level and only a year or two in ...


4

Agile teams are cross-functional teams. They estimate the work from design to delivery often on a story based level. This includes the testing work, since testing should be part of the definition of done. Story points are the relative size of the complexity of the task at hand. Read more about estimating with relative sizes in this blog. I as a tester part ...


4

The TDD cycle is more a development cycle for a developer, to quote James Shore, The Art of Agile, Test-Driven Development chapter: Programmers new to TDD are often surprised at how small each increment can be. Although you might think that only beginners need to work in small steps, my experience is the reverse: the more TDD experience you have, ...


3

The difference between Waterfall methodology and an iterative methodology (agile, Scrum, etc.) is that Waterfall requires each step of a defined process be performed to completion in a particular sequence. In an iterative methodology you complete small slices of the problem at a time by gathering just a few requirements and coding each one to completion, ...


3

Anybody can be the Scrum Master, just make sure the Scrum Master has no other conflict of interest roles as Product Owner, Manager or Stakeholder. Personally I think testers have the potential to be great Scrum Masters, because: Testers discover problems/defects, but often do not demand a certain solution. Its up-to the owners of the issue to find the ...


3

I'd plan it this way: The specific tests that are written 'before the code' are unit tests that are written by developers just before they write the actual code. It should only take 5-20 minutes to write a simple test. The test is written, the code is written for it and then the test is changed or the next test is written and then more unit level code is ...


3

If developers also write unit tests, then what's the point of having special testers in our team and should we replace testers with developers? Unit testing is not the only kind of automated testing. Integration tests, performance tests, scalability tests, and fault tolerance tests are all examples of automated tests that are not unit tests and that a ...


2

You seem to be focused on the technical aspects of doing software QA. I would say your background is good for doing test automation and finding bugs that are results of technical obstacles. However, it takes a strong will to put up with the amount of animosity you may have to control. I find troubling is that no one is bringing up the intense social ...


2

You have a very good background to apply, depending of the company maybe you have to learn something more than you know but just like everything in this life, nobody's born knowing everything. As Nike says Just do it! Finally want to share a very interesting article about QA role in agile teams ...


2

I was given this webpage to read, by my QA Manager: tips for quality testing. It really tells you what testers need to do to be a good tester. A few pointers I have learnt from reading such material, is: Find quality bugs and not quantity of bugs Prepare your documents early, as in create your documents / test scripts early before you start actual testing ...


2

It really depends on how you write your test plans. In that specific case, you can at least do preparatory work, with structure, without details, like "create a customer, enter an invalid age, checke there is an error message, enter a valid age, check the creation works". If you happen to need more detail in your test plan(really depends on the shop), ...


2

I would like to propose that you consider what is needed to support an opinion that the quality of what is being delivered is "Good Enough". In as much as we try to develop systems in general with the end user in mind, asking this question helps you to design the type of data you need to collect. I have found that the generic answers that we would ...


2

It does depend quite a lot on the user story, but there are some general guidelines, with more or less the following order of priority: Essential Tests Acceptance Tests - By definition, the user story can't be accepted if it doesn't pass acceptance testing. The exact form the acceptance tests take will depend on the user story: for back end focused user ...


2

Yes, it is an "opinion" based question but I think that there is not a standard answer because in the Agile world the time is divided into sprints and each sprint contains one or more user stories. The point is that the US of a sprint sometimes are more focused on the back end of the product and sometimes are focused on the front end so the effort of testers ...


2

Unit test should be written by developers. Unit test are very close to the core code and developers have intimate knowledge of how units should work. testers are usually more removed from the deep innards of the core code and they will not be ass effective writing unit tests as core developers are. Acceptance/integration/end-to-end test do not require this ...


2

Instead of voting for closing I am going to use your question as an example to how not to ask questions. How are we supposed to know what do you need ? we don't know what the product is, what are the company's future plans for the product or testing, what is the budget and how much time do you have or can spend automating stuff, what's your priorities, how ...


1

Acceptance tests and Unit tests are critical to testing on Agile teams, but you can't forget to continue to consistently test non-functional requirements (Usability, Performance, etc.) and whatever additional testing needs to be done to ensure there is enough coverage at all levels (subjective per team) to confidently send the completed code to the business ...


1

This might help: http://www.allthingsquality.com/2010/04/what-do-qaers-and-testers-do.html Every company is different. But here are some of the things my QA Teams do, in no particular order. Review and respond to requirements Participate in design reviews Participate in architecture reviews Create and maintain Test Cases Execute Test Cases Exploratory ...


1

The correct way for you to answer would be something like "I'm new to Agile, so I don't really know." If you have non-Agile experience, you could expand on your answer and talk about the number of test cycles on the projects you tested. And if you have read enough about Agile to feel confident that your reading applies to this particular context, then you ...


1

In Agile QA I focus on the testing quadrants I focus on my developers doing a good job in Q1 I work to write good automated UI tests in selenium and capybara for Q2 Exploratory testing is essential and is represented in Q3 Performance and load in Q4 For exploratory testing (Q3) this is where I cover those 'hard to cover',. 'not worth automating', ...


1

If you are trying to look for full coverage it seems theirs a gap between automated testing and then the manual type of exploratory testing (Which...maybe I'm wrong, but it feels almost like smoke testing but you don't really have a specific test "plan" for it). Okay, from this description, I think the problem may be that you are limiting your ...



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