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A few thoughts based on my not-quite-ten years experience as a tester and automator: Learn the principles, not a tool - If you understand the principles of automation and how it works, you're going to be in a much better strategic position than if you simply learn an automation tool. You could do worse than to dig through Joe Strazzere's blog and Alan ...


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Great question. I see two issues, as follows. Using random data may lead to unrepeatable results. You can mitigate this by logging (or otherwise recording) every random choice you make, and then playing those choices back. That could be as easy as recording the initial seed to your random number generator, assuming your data does not change over time. ...


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Diplomacy The ability to tell someone they are wrong without them realizing it. You likely will have to do this in all phases and to most of the people involved on the project on a regular basis. Communication Being able to thoroughly explain your position while telling someone they are wrong. This encompasses both verbal and written. Forward Thinking ...


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Ideally, test automation should be subject to the same level of validation production code gets - which of course tends to lead to the "turtles all the way down" problem with test code that tests the test code which tests the test code which... ad infinitum. What I've found as a viable alternative is a collection of practices and strategies that generally ...


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This is a very strong "yes". You might want to limit yourself a little in the overall validation, but checking response codes only is a strong fail in my opinion. Additionally just checking the result by checking a single phrase or word is not enough. Update: This response answers the topic question: "Should load test validate functionality?" and does not ...


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However you obtain test data, you would like to know that it is appropriate to the intention of the tests. When the test data is defined outside of the tests themselves, there is always the chance that the data will drift away from the intentions of the tests. The chance increases if the data is maintained by someone other than the test automators. If you ...


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You already have a very solid foundation to build on, with your impressive knowledge about QA and your professional skills. If you can supplement that with more technical skills and expertise in test automation, you will have a very valuable (and rare) profile on the job market. From my experience with the many excellent people I have had a chance to work ...


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In case of responsive web application that I'm working for. I use Galen Framework. Galen has their own syntax to define properties of web objects; width, height, position, alignment, text, color and many more. Its simplify and human-readable syntax works for my non-programming co-worker. and it's work well with Selenium GRID and I also use Jenkins to kick it ...


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In my last four years as test automation engineer I developed test automation solutions for web applications and mobile applications. For both application types we always decided to automate functional tests. My opinion is, that no automation tool is good enough to check the GUI well enough. There are so many thinks you have to check: Colors, position of ...


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To expand on bish's answer a bit: Your fixtures aren't supposed to be testing end-to-end functionality of all the subsystems - that's something for manual testing and/or automated functional testing and should be done as little as possible (because it's slow and prone to error - you do that as the top-level sanity testing). Each fixture is - or should be ...


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I would have responded with a clarification of exactly what "offline" means. I can think of three possible definitions. Offline means disconnected from a network. If it is part of the requirements that your application be available without a network connection, then I would begin testing the offline capabilities as soon as those features are ready, as per ...


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Preferable you want each test to run in isolation. You don't want any artifacts of a previous test laying around. So closing the browser after each test sounds as a good thing. A test follows three steps Setup: Launch browser, setup database, etc Test: Run single testcase Teardown: Cleanup I think you can use TestInitialize and TestCleanup methods, see ...


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So you would likely be geared more towards an automation lead role and less towards an automation engineer role. While having extreme technical experience is great, you should understand principles more than practice. Development Principles Learn the basics to a few different programming. Buy some development books that focuses more on the principles than ...


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Try vdbench, it is very flexible and powerful. There are many other file system load generators each with its own ups and downs and with different features, try googling for them.


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The usual definition of a test plan is detailed here. The image you've posted, however, is exactly how Microsoft Test Manager is organized. You create a "test plan" (in their terminology this means the tests to be executed) for a certain release or sprint. In a test plan, you may have one or more test suites, which contain test cases. (Normally grouped in a ...


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Start by looking for testing tasks that require a lot of manual effort and do not change from one release to the next. This is especially important for UI automation; if a web page changes frequently, you will spend so much time updating your automated test that it will have been faster to test the page by hand. Note that there are often ways to use ...


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To broadly address your question, just pick some test cases with simple interactions that aren't very dynamic and automate those. Trial, error, and practice will get you there. Is Java mostly used for Selenium tests? Do you recommend it over C#? According to StackOverflow, there are more Selenium tagged questions in Java than any other language (as of ...


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Coming back to share a solution that I find suitable. I wrote a framework based on nose2 (a python testing framework), that allows me to write hierarchical setups and teardown, thanks to such, a nose2 plugin. start_vms test_vms_are_started configure interfaces test_interfaces configure_dhcp test_dhcp configure_nat ...


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Scriptcover is Javascript only. List of code coverage tools: http://c2.com/cgi/wiki?CodeCoverageTools http://stackoverflow.com/questions/39329/what-is-your-favourite-code-coverage-tools-free-and-non-free This article summarizes how-to and how-not-to use code coverage: http://www.exampler.com/testing-com/writings/coverage.pdf Other related and useful ...


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The load test should reflect the kind of traffic you expect to see in production. If that means a lack of button presses when a page is in a certain state, that's what you should do. The fact that the server allows workflows that the client prevents is good to know, but apparently your customer believes most traffic will come from users who use the ...


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You have mixed questions which fall in multiple categories Automation Coverage (Functional / Regression Maintenance) Automation Design Aspects - Maintainability Automation ROI timeline vs Cost of Development Each Factor need to analysed separately How do you develop automation, Is it extensible, How easy to modify / add new cases ? Duration of ...


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A white box tester openly reviews the source code. A grey box tester will typically manually verify that the code functions correctly and then review the source code. Automation engineer writes code that tests the code. Often times a person can perform all 3 (I currently do). Typically a white/grey box tester will assist in the writing of the code but, ...


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As for me - there no such role as "white box tester". It should be a programmer, who create and maintain unit tests over own code changes. If project developed in TDD model - tests and code developed by same person.



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