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24

"Value to career" is a tough thing to call. I don't have a certification, and as far as I know, I've never hired anyone with a certification. That could be due to my location, or just a coincidence, or could be a point demonstrating their lack of value. I do know that I've never considered ISTQB/ISEB Certification of any value while reviewing candidates' ...


7

I am aware of the current "certification is evil" line going through the software testing community. I have to say that, I don't agree with this line. As user246 mentioned, people do occaisionally attain this certification to be more marketable. People also often sometimes take this certification early in their careers in the hopes of learning more. ...


6

I wouldn't hire someone based on a QA certification, but I wouldn't hold it against them either. In a tight job market, a person might try a lot of things to make themselves more marketable.


4

The career path most definitely exists if you make it for yourself. I know of a few testers who have gone on to purely security. Functional approaches and security approaches can often overlap each other, and many of those who I speak with in the security field are grateful for their previous test experience. After a time however, I've found that often ...


4

Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing worth knowing can be taught - Oscar Wilde If the effort you make to acquire certifications in the field of software testing in it's current form would encourgae you read more relevant stuff related to testing and you firmly believe that is going to help you think ...


4

"The answer to any sufficiently complex question is, It Depends" In this case, I think it depends on where you work. Where I work (msft), I don't manage people, but I am at a fairly high "level" within the organization. I choose not to manage people because it allows me to do more of the work that I enjoy doing. I've never been a consultant, but I'm told my ...


4

Testing certifications are crap. Suck it up and do a Comp Sci degree as it will leave you with far more tech related options than QA. What if you decide you don't like QA?


4

I have 2 years of experience in manual testing, and I am currently learning automation testing in my spare time. Great, try and implement some of the techniques you are using in your spare time at your work too. This will lead to a great deal of success at learning and speed up your manual testing process drastically. My primary cause for Automation at most ...


3

Your title mentions ITIL training, while your question talks about ITIL certification. Training and certification are not the same thing. You may find some benefit from the training, while the certification may provide little to no value. To examine the training aspect, look at what you will learn during any classes, look at the syllabus, etc. Decide if ...


3

Well... No, in my opinion the ISTQB Foundation level certification does not guarantee that you can test. Learning the specifics of the job requires practice, depth of knowledge, experience, etc. ISTQB preparation teaches you basic terminology. Processes and even testing techniques are not covered well... Anyway, think about it that way: "ISTQB does not ...


3

What kind of certification are you talking about? You wrote something about foundation certification, I'm assuming it to be ISTQB. Well I have one of those and it didn't help me in any way. I didn't learn anything that I didn't already know before it. I didn't get promoted. My pay scale is still the same. If you are looking to widen your skill set, then ...


3

Well to learn about testing I would suggest not to go for any certification. It won't do much good. Rather read blogs and articles about testing. Follow expert testers like Scott Barber, Cem Kaner, Jerry Weinberg, James Bach, Michael Bolton, Brad Pettichord and many others. Read their blogs and books written by them. Read about psychology. Practice testing ...


3

It seems like I'm the only person answering who's actually done the ISEB, so far. Don't waste money on a course - for the cost of attending a training course, you could sit the exam in one of the Prometric test centres 5 times over. The book and syllabus is more than enough, IMHO. I attended a course, but it really wasn't necessary to pass the exam. ...


3

Does it mean you can test? As has already been stated above several times, certainly not. Does it help? I can't really think of any situations where it would be a negative (at the worst, a non-factor maybe), so it certainly can't affect your employability - which, let's face it, is a rather important part of the "software testing career" experience. On ...


3

Do you like management ? If not, then the career path us not obvious... You can become a consultant, a specialist - or stay as a tester. That's what I am, I've done test management and consultancy but being a great tester is my chosen career path at the moment


3

No, absolutely. The problem with ISTQB Syllabus is that it does not really reflect modern approaches and methodologies (especially in agile environments). I attended ISTQB training recently myself and I must say that at least half of it was useless (problems that were mentioned do not exist in agile team to which I belong). But... Although it does not say ...


2

Judge for yourself: scan the ads and see what % mention certification and what % require it. ISTQB certification shows that you mastered some common body of knowledge and glossary. For me it is a nice-to-have sort of thing.


2

If your employer is telling you to do the qualification, could you ask them for some training? The ISEB Foundation course is relatively easy to pass, and with instruction I think a 2-3 day intensive course would be enough to learn the syllabus. Training providers are abundant and can be found through all good search engines.


2

Full disclosure: I've not completed the ISEB certification, however prior to moving to development I managed a QA/Test team of 5, two of who had completed the foundation certification. My suggestions are: Remember, this is similar to every other qualification that you've ever done so the same basic principles hold true: Plan: Put together a study plan ...


2

The conversation about certification is a totally another topic, and I would leave it out of here. Certifications won't play a major or an important role in your career path. Options are many, but mainly I would divide into management track and technology track. I have worked with CEO who was formerly a QA Engineer, attained his MBA and advanced to ...


2

I agree with Suchit, certifications and career advancement are very different. The majority of Testing Managers I've worked for or with have had very little testing experience but were promoted for one reason or another. Some companies may prefer to hire professional managers (MBAs) for certain jobs while other companies would rather promote someone with ...


2

First, please feel free to use whatever terms you like to describe what you do or what you want to do. (I happen to like the term tester - I think it's more accurate). Second, you've got some research to do. Start with articles online about software testing, look into buying a few books like Testing Computer Software by Cem Kaner, and think about taking ...


1

The CA who signed the certificate ought to be in the browser's list of trusted CA's; otherwise, the browser may report a problem or even prevent you from reaching the site. As I understand it, a wildcarded CA is wildcarded relative to a subdomain. You should verify that it does in fact work with every applicable subdomain. (You can do that by testing ...


1

Because we don't know you, your skills, your other options, and your job market, we have no way to give you good valid advice, beyond "it depends". Also, responses given here in stack exchange sites should be usable by other people who would find it. This, by definition, cannot be true for a personal career advice. For that reason, career advice like you ...


1

I have also have been on the foundation course and feel that it presented no gain in my career. The course however would have been of great help when I had first started my career as a software tester. It highlights some of the basic techniques that can be applied and tries to put the concepts behind testing into perspective. I am sure that "anyone" could ...


1

The following thread includes discussions regarding the value of certifications in the software testing profession in general: Do ISTQB/ISEB Testing Certificates prove someone can test? It doesn't answer your specific question regarding ITIL certification, but should be pretty informative.


1

The worth of the certification depends totally on your environment. It's definitely possible to do good quality assurance or testing without the certificate. On the otherhand, knowing more about IT services doesn't hurt, but if taking the course means that you can't participate in some other course, I think you can find better choices. Finally, when looking ...


1

Not exactly. It may prove that you have understood the concepts but that doesn't mean that ur good at hunting bugs.


1

The answer will depend on your current employer, what industry they're in, how hard you are willing to work, how flexible you are, and where you live. While testing can be an interesting and rewarding job, there is only so far you can go as a tester. However, you can use what you learn as a tester to move into another kind of job in the same industry, e.g. ...


1

No, a testing certificate doesn't prove you can test. Having said that, I have sat (and passed) the ISEB Foundation and Intermediate levels and the ISTQB Advanced Test Analyst. For each of those I read a bunch of books and articles, then paid to sit the exam. It was definitely worth reading the books - I learned some useful things. I think it was just about ...



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