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19

"Value to career" is a tough thing to call. I don't have a certification, and as far as I know, I've never hired anyone with a certification. That could be due to my location, or just a coincidence, or could be a point demonstrating their lack of value. I do know that I've never considered ISTQB/ISEB Certification of any value while reviewing candidates' ...


6

I am aware of the current "certification is evil" line going through the software testing community. I have to say that, I don't agree with this line. As user246 mentioned, people do occaisionally attain this certification to be more marketable. People also often sometimes take this certification early in their careers in the hopes of learning more. ...


4

"The answer to any sufficiently complex question is, It Depends" In this case, I think it depends on where you work. Where I work (msft), I don't manage people, but I am at a fairly high "level" within the organization. I choose not to manage people because it allows me to do more of the work that I enjoy doing. I've never been a consultant, but I'm told my ...


4

The career path most definitely exists if you make it for yourself. I know of a few testers who have gone on to purely security. Functional approaches and security approaches can often overlap each other, and many of those who I speak with in the security field are grateful for their previous test experience. After a time however, I've found that often ...


3

Education is an admirable thing, but it is well to remember from time to time that nothing worth knowing can be taught - Oscar Wilde If the effort you make to acquire certifications in the field of software testing in it's current form would encourgae you read more relevant stuff related to testing and you firmly believe that is going to help you think ...


3

Does it mean you can test? As has already been stated above several times, certainly not. Does it help? I can't really think of any situations where it would be a negative (at the worst, a non-factor maybe), so it certainly can't affect your employability - which, let's face it, is a rather important part of the "software testing career" experience. On ...


3

Well... No, in my opinion the ISTQB Foundation level certification does not guarantee that you can test. Learning the specifics of the job requires practice, depth of knowledge, experience, etc. ISTQB preparation teaches you basic terminology. Processes and even testing techniques are not covered well... Anyway, think about it that way: "ISTQB does not ...


3

It seems like I'm the only person answering who's actually done the ISEB, so far. Don't waste money on a course - for the cost of attending a training course, you could sit the exam in one of the Prometric test centres 5 times over. The book and syllabus is more than enough, IMHO. I attended a course, but it really wasn't necessary to pass the exam. ...


2

If your employer is telling you to do the qualification, could you ask them for some training? The ISEB Foundation course is relatively easy to pass, and with instruction I think a 2-3 day intensive course would be enough to learn the syllabus. Training providers are abundant and can be found through all good search engines.


2

Full disclosure: I've not completed the ISEB certification, however prior to moving to development I managed a QA/Test team of 5, two of who had completed the foundation certification. My suggestions are: Remember, this is similar to every other qualification that you've ever done so the same basic principles hold true: Plan: Put together a study plan ...


2

The conversation about certification is a totally another topic, and I would leave it out of here. Certifications won't play a major or an important role in your career path. Options are many, but mainly I would divide into management track and technology track. I have worked with CEO who was formerly a QA Engineer, attained his MBA and advanced to ...


2

No, absolutely. The problem with ISTQB Syllabus is that it does not really reflect modern approaches and methodologies (especially in agile environments). I attended ISTQB training recently myself and I must say that at least half of it was useless (problems that were mentioned do not exist in agile team to which I belong). But... Although it does not say ...


2

Your title mentions ITIL training, while your question talks about ITIL certification. Training and certification are not the same thing. You may find some benefit from the training, while the certification may provide little to no value. To examine the training aspect, look at what you will learn during any classes, look at the syllabus, etc. Decide if ...


2

I agree with Suchit, certifications and career advancement are very different. The majority of Testing Managers I've worked for or with have had very little testing experience but were promoted for one reason or another. Some companies may prefer to hire professional managers (MBAs) for certain jobs while other companies would rather promote someone with ...


1

You don't mention where you are - in some countries employers are more likely to want certifications, in others not so much. As Merch says, you definitely want to explore your options more. If you can switch some of your electives to comp sci courses, I'd recommend doing that in your next semester to give you a better idea if this is where you want to be. ...


1

The CA who signed the certificate ought to be in the browser's list of trusted CA's; otherwise, the browser may report a problem or even prevent you from reaching the site. As I understand it, a wildcarded CA is wildcarded relative to a subdomain. You should verify that it does in fact work with every applicable subdomain. (You can do that by testing ...


1

The following thread includes discussions regarding the value of certifications in the software testing profession in general: Do ISTQB/ISEB Testing Certificates prove someone can test? It doesn't answer your specific question regarding ITIL certification, but should be pretty informative.


1

The worth of the certification depends totally on your environment. It's definitely possible to do good quality assurance or testing without the certificate. On the otherhand, knowing more about IT services doesn't hurt, but if taking the course means that you can't participate in some other course, I think you can find better choices. Finally, when looking ...


1

The answer will depend on your current employer, what industry they're in, how hard you are willing to work, how flexible you are, and where you live. While testing can be an interesting and rewarding job, there is only so far you can go as a tester. However, you can use what you learn as a tester to move into another kind of job in the same industry, e.g. ...


1

No, but it normally proves, you that you will understand what the ISTQB test manager and the other ISTQB tester mean. Many project managers think that testing is that obvious that one need no education for it, it is certainly wrong. A big value is - one would not disturb good testing process by implementing his not-understanding about testing and qa.


1

I have also have been on the foundation course and feel that it presented no gain in my career. The course however would have been of great help when I had first started my career as a software tester. It highlights some of the basic techniques that can be applied and tries to put the concepts behind testing into perspective. I am sure that "anyone" could ...


1

No, a testing certificate doesn't prove you can test. Having said that, I have sat (and passed) the ISEB Foundation and Intermediate levels and the ISTQB Advanced Test Analyst. For each of those I read a bunch of books and articles, then paid to sit the exam. It was definitely worth reading the books - I learned some useful things. I think it was just about ...



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