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8

I know this problem way too well. There's no "right" answer, unfortunately, but there are some things you can do to help with this problem. Dependency map - do you have a list of application features that have heavy dependencies and tend to break when changes occur in other areas? If you know changes in feature X tend to break feature Y, you know you ...


4

Firstly, I've been exactly where you are and I know the pain you're going through. It's also very 'cool' at the moment for everyone to talk about 'Automation' and how it's a 'golden ticket' to Continuous Integration. Everybody wants their stuff out fast. There are ways to tackle this, but personally, I think a lot of comes with having an understanding of ...


3

There are many cases where unit testing as you have described would not be "sufficient". (And you haven't really defined what you mean by "sufficient" in this case. Good enough to move the code to Production? Good enough to pass it on to QA? Good enough to please your boss? Good enough to feel like you did a good job? Something else?) In most practical ...


3

Not exactly. Unit testing only isolates units in isolation. In these tests all dependencies to other units are mocked or stubbed out. So how do you know those units together do what they are supposed to do? Code tends to grow hierarchically in complexity, and with that growth comes more and more units working together, more and more groups of units ...


2

I have encountered exactly the same problem and there is no "right" answer, but I can share with you what I've learned: 1) Code changes in one place can cause problems in another. Unless your project is so incredibly well documented that you know exactly what a change can impact, testing the full application on releases is important. 2) Find a balance ...


2

You have many excellent answers already. Adding my 2 cents to say that your story hits close to home. Management and I have come to an agreeable compromise which is that I created "Mini regression" test scenarios for only the high traffic areas and modules of the program. The Mini Regression is performed as needed, but usually during installation testing. ...


2

For backend coverage (mostly java), we use Cobertura: http://cobertura.github.io/cobertura/ The developers tend to use Emma, in Eclipse: http://emma.sourceforge.net/ For frontend (JavaScript), I've heard good things about ScriptCover: http://googletesting.blogspot.com/2011/10/scriptcover-makes-javascript-coverage.html Good luck!


1

Here's a tool that allows you to get code coverage data per test case and then compare against other tests or all tests: http://www.semanticdesigns.com/Products/TestCoverage/JavaTestCoverage.html


1

You could implement your own version of minset that would be useful to anyone that uses gcov/lcov or, with a small modification, also to users of other code coverage measuring tools. Export gcov/lcov report to some processable format, e.g. XML. The report should describe coverage per method/class/package (granularity is up to you) for each test you ...


1

Basically your problem is you are trying to squeeze two months of work into one, make yourself super efficient while also dealing with an inordinate amount of code, and a large group of people who are claiming that you are slowing them down. All true, and while all of the answers given will help, you will also need to use some diplomacy in being able to ...


1

Even theoretically, unit testing isn't sufficient because it doesn't cover the paths through the system. You can cover every line of code in a system, but not cover every potential way through it. For instance, can you launch the application? Does it run on all the target operating systems? Does it render correctly? These are all out of the scope of unit ...


1

Can't help with .net as I mainly have experience at a java shop. We use a combo of sonar and Jacoco. Check out Jacoco! I just installed it on the machines where we execute our service tests and the reports it generates are nice and can be integrated into CI easily (using ant). It's actively worked on, and has a Maven plug-in. The coolest feature for me ...


1

Visual Studio 2012 has a pretty good code coverage tool. I have used it to measure code coverage of a web service. It is easy to integrate into build systems, you have out of the box support for TeamBuild (the TFS build) - see a more detailed article here. According to msdn it has result merging. Code coverage is also integrated in Microsoft Test ...



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