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8

This Stack Overflow thread suggests that there are differences and the modes are not totally accurate. Depends on your definition of risk and how accurate the results have to be for you and your stakeholders


3

Sadly, years of playing with emulators of one form or another has taught me a very simple lesson: There is no substitute for testing your software on it's target No matter how good a simulator or emulator you are running, there will be enough situations that the sim/em-ulator doesn't cover 100% accurately that you are leaving potential problems I've also ...


3

What you're looking for is called a javascript profiler. Most modern browsers include some kind of a profiler with their developer toolkits. Here are some links Chrome JS Profiler Firefox JS Profiler A good code profiler (JS or not) will tell you who started what function call (stack trace or call tree), how long the particular function was running and ...


2

Where I work, there are three web applications that need to be maintained, with a fourth (which is intended to unify all three existing applications) in development. Each has a distinct purpose: Application 1 is an enterprise-level employee and payroll management web application used by both internal payroll specialists and externally by customers. ...


2

We've gone through a very similar process over the last few years and I can share some things that have worked for us. What to Test There are a lot of facets to web apps and there's a lot of benefit in testing behind-the-scenes code, but the best place to start is usually the web interface (so browser automation tests). This will help you identify where ...


2

Yes , I have tested a responsive site into the Different browser. In Google Chrome Browser to test the Responsive view press F12.-> Click on 'Toggle Device Mode' , Using this option we can select the different type of device mode. Another option is we can add app which is "Responsive Web Design Tester", using this on right click menu Responsive Web ...


2

A lot depends on what you want the front-end automation to do. Given that you've got a lot of web forms with code behind, I'd honestly consider starting with the unit test framework built into Visual Studio, and using that to test the data handling (I'd recommend taking a look at Channel9's TechEd videos for an idea of what you can do with Visual Studio ...


2

I assume your web application is for external customers (so your users can use web app in many browsers and operating systems outside of your control). Which is very interesting challenge - exactly what we are doing :-) You are excellently positioned to use new future W3C standard for browser automation, Selenium Webdriver (Se 2). (In a way, you ...


1

I can share my experience. I initially do functional testing to understand the data flows, pre-requisites, dependencies. Based on this I try to come up with reusable data scripts. Example. If data need to be populated for last 2 days, the script would be like (getdate()-2, values). With this every time when you run you would get required data Custom Store ...


1

Only you can really answer that. A good testing framework that can run functional test automation is software, like any other; you'd have to write it and maintain it, but you might find it easier to add tests when you don't have to worry about flakey record-and-playback, and once you have a decent framework, other developers can pitch in and write tests ...


1

Preferable you want each test to run in isolation. You don't want any artifacts of a previous test laying around. So closing the browser after each test sounds as a good thing. A test follows three steps Setup: Launch browser, setup database, etc Test: Run single testcase Teardown: Cleanup I think you can use TestInitialize and TestCleanup methods, see ...


1

The Internet Explorer Dev Team provide a compatibility scanner that should help flag up incompatibilities with modern versions of Internet Explorer: https://www.modern.ie/en-gb/compat-scan If you need to run the tool from an intranet, here's the open source version: https://github.com/InternetExplorer/modern.IE-static-code-scan There's plenty more info and ...


1

Ask the employees who use other browsers about known issues on non-IE8 browsers, assuming you don't track those issues yet. Have an experienced developer do a cursory check of the code to spot known incompatibilities. Run the existing automated tests with the new standard browser instead of the old one. Define high priority applications, where failure is ...


1

If you're using Visual Studio Ultimate the best option would be using Web Test project type, it can easily handle dynamic stuff and can be converted to Load Test if necessary. If you need browser-based testing, the best choice would be Selenium Webdriver which has .NET/C# client binding. If options 1 and/or 2 for some reasons are unsuitable you can look ...


1

As well as the windows performance monitor, all the browsers come with developer tools which include a fair amount of monitoring, especially of load times. If you combine perfmon for CPU and memory use with the browser dev tools for load times, you should have everything you need.


1

Windows comes with an app called Windows Performance Monitor. You can set up monitors by process (each browser/tab will have it's own process). So long as the tab is open you can set it up to be monitored. You can track CPU usage, memory, all kinds of stuff. It also has charts to visualize your metrics over time.


1

For web app testing, I am giving some points/suggestions according to my experience : UI Testing : It should be done on various configurations like Windows XP/7 + FF, Mac OS + Safari and so on. Functionality Testing : It should be done for testing the functionality of the web app. For Ex. What should be the nest step if I click on a particular link ? etc ...


1

Update:You can use inbuilt mode in chrome browser for responsive design testing. With help of device mode you can do following: Test your responsive designs by emulating different screen sizes and resolutions, including Retina displays. Evaluate your site's performance using the network emulator, without affecting traffic to other tabs. Visualize and ...


1

Create a desktop background with overlapping boxes at the resolutions you need. Resize the browser windows to match those boxes as needed. Sometimes a lo-fi solution is the best.


1

What you are overlooking is one simple fact: if solution what you half-proposed was feasible, Google engineers would be working to make it available for last few years. And in my experience they are VERY smart, it is futile to try to outsmart them (at least for me - maybe you are much smarter). Browsers ARE genuinely different, and packing all the ...


1

The short answer is No. There are so-called capture/playback tools that purport to record a browser session and play it back for you automatically. In practice they are unreliable and/or require manual editing. This is especially true when the scenarios are long, the user interface is asynchronous, and the target spans multiple browser types/versions.


1

Sauce Labs might help. You should be able to do a trial with them and start a mac/safari emulation just fine. https://saucelabs.com/


1

Some things I've consider from a strategy point of view in various situations: Could you move to a 'test based on change' approach? Could you monitor the industry for software upgrades (of for example browsers) and new screens (with different dimensions and characteristics) and thus test in response to change as opposed to periodic testing? Clearly you do ...


1

If the order in which you spawn the windows is known, can you capture the handle value from the first window and then assume that the second window is the one that doesn't match that handle. I am rusty on AutoIt so I didn't put any code, but I did use the oh so cool window info tool to get the values I would try to use. It's a life saver in situations like ...


1

Have you tried having a look at Selenium or what is now called Webdriver (Selenium2)? You can use the Selenium IDE to record your tests on Firefox. However after the tests have been written they can be converted to other languages such as C#. Java. Once that is done its quite easy to get the same test to run on Internet Explorer, Chrome, Mobile browsers, ...



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