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21

If test automation does the job it is intended to, when a defect is introduced, it should be found and fixed very quickly, hopefully within a single daily cycle. If this is how the automation suite is working, then automation should become a "barrier" that prevents new bugs from being created in code that is already working and tested. When you think of it ...


14

My personal preference is SnagIt. I've never found it too intensive or jumpy. It's worked equally well for me with XP and higher. Although, on a Windows 7 machine, I tend to use PSR.exe a lot.


14

Do you think you would find the remaining 5% of bugs that are currently found through a suite of manual tests if you spent that time doing exploratory testing instead? Would managers have the confidence in test coverage that they need to make decisions without those functional tests? I think the biggest risk of not having a manual functional test suite ...


12

I don't like the statement because it assumes that the only thing you can automate are regression tests. If you rewrote the statment as "Regression tests don't find new bugs", then I think it's accurate. I often write automation (e.g. performance, data driven, or model-based tests) that find new bugs - and I think the automation effort is incomplete without ...


7

The lightest tool I've seen is Rapid Reporter. Light, smart, and free, written by a thoughtful person who loves testing. http://testing.gershon.info/reporter/


6

You may find yourself tempted to write out a bunch of charters early on to show management types so that it doesn't look like you're sitting on your hands. Resist this urge if you find it upon you. There's no real need to overcomplicate charters. If start a session and you realize the scope is overambitious, modify the scope and note down whatever new ...


6

As well as SnagIt (good shout Lyndon) I am starting to use Rapid Reporter which is proving to be a v. useful exploratory testing tool. It doesn't do video, but I use SnagIt for the video (once a defect has been found) to support the other documentation provided / generated by Rapid Reporter


6

"Is it worth while spending the time to write a full suite of manual functional tests if hardly any defects are found from them?" That depends - is the purpose of writing them to find defects? If so, then it sounds like you would be better off putting your energy into spending more time testing. If you're considering dropping them, then it doesn't sound ...


5

I use two tools for these kinds of problems. One which I found because it is recommended by Michael Bolton (just to credit the source) is BB TestAssistant - http://www.bbsoftware.co.uk/BBTestAssistant.aspx which has a free express license available. The other is a tool called Jing which is free http://www.techsmith.com/jing/. BB TestAssistant I use for ...


5

I think there's one more piece to the answer that I see being hinted at in others' responses, but not directly called out. Often, automated tests are created in such a way that even non-essential details are locked in and executed the same way. This leads to what has been referred to as the Pesticide Paradox or the minefield analogy. Bugs are found when ...


5

I recently discovered PSR.exe, which is part of Windows 7 (just type in psr in the search field). It allows the user to record everything he or she does (like Snagit), but also makes it easy to add comments and to highlight certain regions of the screen. Once you finish recording, everything will be saved in a zip file as a so called ".mht" file. When you ...


5

The theory behind it is that an automated test will only catch exactly what it tests for. Since someone had to code it manually, someone is aware of how it will fail. By this definition it's not a new bug - someone already knows about it when they write the test. One could argue that it can catch new bugs, but not new symptoms. A lot of it depends on ...


5

I will predicate my answer on the assumption that you believe you are leveraging exploratory testing as well as you can; in other words, that you do not believe you can discover more than 95% of your defects via exploratory testing. I think the gist of your question is, "Is it worth the additional work of having a full suite of manual tests in order to ...


5

Not saying that it's cheap, but, tools like OneNote tend to fill this void very well. We use a notebook for each application. For projects, we use Tabs/Sections for Modules/areas, and for operational type changes, we use a new section for each Release. Each session takes up 1 page. These get stored on either a sharepoint or in a shared folder that we all ...


4

Hey. Other possibility is Test Explorer. It has very nice features: record test as 'steps' which reflect what tester did Capture screenshot for every step record movie add notes to test during recording save test as baseline record local files usage record registry changes record system resources used replay test (which is actually displaying steps from ...


4

Caveat: I've discussed and thought about testing playbooks a little - I'm not convinced that I necessarily have the same interpretation as others, partly because there hasn't been enough discussion of the idea (that I'm aware of, would love references if people have them) for a consensus to develop. This is my best attempt at this point in time, it will ...


4

1) As a free solution: You can use FFmpeg for full screen recording. For windows it requires ScreenCapturer (also free and opensource). For linux it can record the screen natively. http://svnpenn.blogspot.com/2011/10/ffmpeg-screencast-windows.html 2) Camstudio is also a good solution. The output files may be huge, but you always can encode it with FFmpeg ...


4

Use whatever you are comfortable with. I'd suggest starting with something basic for recording notes like Notepad++. The important thing is to be able to keep detailed notes about your session, to setup a session charter, etc. Once you've got some practice with it, you can see what works and what doesn't. I've used Rapid Reporter and Session Tester as ...


3

Try Wink, it's very light because it captures a screenshot on each click or keystroke. You can export to PDF for printing or make it a Flash video. It works on all Windows versions, recorded projects tend to grow huge.


3

Back in high school we made movies playing games via a program called Fraps. I don't know if it exists anymore, but it might be worth looking in to. Don't ask how did we ever manage to convince our guidance consular that there was actual educational value in doing that! :-)


3

In my experience, I tend to find more bugs while I'm creating the automated tests than I find by executing them. Still, it's not true that automated tests don't find bugs - some automated tests find some bugs, even if it's not many. And done well, the cost of executing automated tests is low enough that it's worth doing. I don't view the automation choice ...


3

I like to keep things simple. I work with a small team of testers and programmers. We like to keep things lightweight. For managing charters and information flow, I use a spreadsheet and a whiteboard. I categorize charters by product area. I haven't found getting more detailed than that to be useful to me (or others). I name charter files by their product ...


2

Recently I learned about Screenpresso http://www.screenpresso.com/ It's not as good as SnagIt but much better than Jing. In free version you can record videos only up to 20 secs. This limitation is gone in paid version.


2

Have you tried qTrace? They seem to be coming out with a free version of their screen capture and defect submitting tool. It integrates directly with a bunch of bug trackers, I used it with Bugzilla nicely. Found it here: http://qasymphony.com/qtrace-features.html


2

Snagit (Windows, MacOsX), fraps (Windows). But I used snagit almost exclusively for taking annotated screenshots with arrows and stuff.


2

I use a combination of three tools for screen capture while I am testing, be it exploratory or scripted. For screen recording BB Flashback Express is the free version of BB Test Assistant (http://www.bbsoftware.co.uk/BBFlashBack_FreePlayer.aspx). I set it to record constantly and retain 10 minutes of footage. This keeps the file size down, and resource ...


2

Really depnds on the person testing. I've yet to find a solution that works for everyone. Since I'm normally testing on windows machines, I tend to use a combination of psr.exe with OneNote and occaisionally SnagIt for when I need a screen shot to remind me exactly what to look at later if it's not in the scope of what I'm working on. Normally I'm not a ...


2

What I currently (well, over one year already) "misuse" as a kind of session reporter is the "BB Testassistant Expert". I heard about it in the RST class of Michael Bolton and got me the budget to buy it. Its under 200 EURO, plus one update of 60 EURO last winter. I just start it in the beginning and let it run. On my test machine it is not intrusive and ...


2

What do you do with your scripted manual tests? If they are just executed by testers once or twice then tossed you probably can change your process & reduce/eliminate the extra paperwork. But if any one else is using them, then consider the impact outside of QA before elimating them. Do you have requirements so that the legal department is expecting ...


2

We find 95% of the defects during exploratory testing so isit worth while spending the time to write a full suit of manual functional tests if hardly any defects are found from them??? The fact that you find 95% of the bugs you currently find using one approach is interesting. But the real questions are: are you being effective? Are you finding all ...



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