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The most efficient tool for testing the appearance of a website is still the human eye and brain. That said, if you want or need to automate, image comparison is probably the least effective method because even with fuzzy logic it can generate far too many false positives. All it takes is a change in hardware (a different monitor or video card - this will ...


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The size() function returns the number of elements found with the getElements() function, I expect it to return just one table element. The value of size equals 1. I would get the HTML inside the table and count the occurrences of <tr> or something unique per row, expecting you do not have nested tables with rows inside the initial table. The code for ...


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GUI automation is very tricky to say the least. As a general rule of thumb GUI automation demands that the automated test 'know' the machine state at all times. This means that we shouldn't assume that a particular window has focus. If the automation requires a window to have focus it should check to make sure that window has focus and if not set focus to ...


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Tests that explore the GUI of an application need to simulate the keyboard and mouse to send commands. They also need to read the screen to validate that the correct things are displayed. To me the mechanisms for keyboard and mouse entry and for screen reading are more important than the programming language. However as your application is in C# writing the ...


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The Microsoft stack is surprisingly still very popular, regardless of other cheaper alternatives. TFS is basically the central repository. Call it git and Jenkins rolled into one. It manages version control as well as builds. MTM is just Microsoft's test management tool. This is very useful for linking a manual test that has been created within MTM (its ...


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Here's the short rundown on TFS and the Microsoft application life cycle management ecosystem: TFS - Team Foundation Server is the "glue" that pulls everything together in a central repository. TFS can be used to manage builds (using MSBuild.exe), issues, test cases, automation, source control, and so forth. Visual Studio - As well as the code IDE, Visual ...


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I think the best single book to read for your situation is The Design of Everyday Things by Donald Norman. He's the other half Norman / Nielsen group linked in Peter's answer and a pioneer of the usability field. He talks about a lot of important concepts like affordances, mappings, forcing functions, and so many many others. The concepts in this book are ...


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I have read two great books written by Steve Krug, which I think are a must read for anyone doing usability testing. Don't Make Me Think Rocket Surgery Made Easy Both are easy to read and you should be able to read both in a day (or two). Maybe also ask the question on http://ux.stackexchange.com/, guess that community might have better getting started ...


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I don't know any tool parsing exit codes. Anyway, I suppose "Programmatically" (writing own script) is the best solution. At least you know, what's happening and can fix it yourself quick. Here's batch script as an example: qftest.exe ... if %ERRORLEVEL% EQU 1 ( command1; command2; etc ) if %ERRORLEVEL% EQU 2 ( command1; command2; etc )



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