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As of my reading- Guerrilla Testing means going into a coffee shop or another public place to ask people there about your product or prototype. It can be conducted anywhere ex- cafe, library, train station etc, essentially anywhere where there is significant footfall. Guerrilla testing works well to quickly validate how effective a design is on its intended ...


4

What is Guerrilla Testing: It is a way to get some quick user feedback on your product or prototype. I can say its usability testing. Guerrilla Testing Covers: It covers an activity by which you need to conduct it where your audience are novice users and observe these - Can they find the content? Is the language relevant to them? Have they understood ...


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Selenium is an industry standard for web GUI. But desktop GUI automation is almost an untilled field. There are several disparate tools that are able to deal with few types of GUI. I know only one cross-platform open source project for GUI testing based on accessibility technologies (therefore text-based): it's LDTP. But in my mind the interface is really ...


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Info: These testcases are critical functionality. Judging by the above statement, I'd say you need to have both unit tests and UI automated tests (or integration as well depending on the architecture layer and systems integrated). However, there are pros and cons on using both (that mostly depends on the organization, engineer in charge of creating one ...


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There are number of tools available in the market for Screen capture- Greenshot: PicPick: http://ngwin.com/picpick/update?AVGAFFILIATE=11859 Gadwin PrintScreen: http://www.gadwin.com/download/ Jing : https://www.techsmith.com/jing.html SnagIt: https://www.techsmith.com/snagit.html


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Gorilla Testing is a testing technique in which testers or developers also join to testers to test a particular module thoroughly in all aspects. Gorilla Testing is a technique in which repetitive Manual Testing process, which a tester would have done several times before, is done again to test the robustness of the system. Here, one module of the ...


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Guerilla testing is an inexpensive but highly effective form of test in which a product is subject to high levels of stress until failure. You can see a classic example here.


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There are a number of test tracking tools or test case management tools, Some SaS ( pay by user) TestRail TestLodge Some one off purchases Microsoft Test Manager SoftBear Test Complete Some FreeWare MozTrap As with any software selection, carefully consider why you want to use the product and what you want it to help you achieve. All those I ...


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As of my reading- Red-Box Testing: It is nothing but a Protocol testing. User / Client can apply any techniques to accept the project. They will apply white box or grey box or black box for accepting the project. So we are calling the user acceptance testing as a red box testing. Yellow box Testing: Yellow box testing is checking against the warning ...


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Yellow Box Testing includes the Acceptance Testing Techniques while Green Box Testing contains the Release Testing Techniques.


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You can check this question and answers, you can find some explanations in there: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3620990/what-is-red-box-yellow-box-and-green-box-testing


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I'm using PrtScr It is quick, and simple... Lets you take a full screen screenshot, or draw the area you want... It also lets you draw with a red line "pen" And you can save the image where you want, or save it on desktop, or simply copy the image to clipboard... Try it...


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I have here 2 free testing tools: Nimbus and HotShots. I see the Nimbus (https://nimbus.everhelper.me/screenshot.php) as a rising star of screenshot tools for testers. It enables some after-capture functionalities such as highlighting, frames, text comments etc. Nimbus: It is available as Chrome and Firefox addons, works on Android and runs on Windows. ...


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We’ve been using Ranorex for quite a while now and we are really happy with this tool. It supports web, desktop and mobile applications, so we need not use three or more different tools for testing. It also nice that the test modules can be reused.


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Traditionally Linux GUIs are just a thin layer over a command line application, consider testing the command line application separately than test the GUI using a mock application.


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Probably you're talking about some kind of smoke testing. Usually it's done as a system/integration testing. Unit testing is a responsibility of every developer not a QA engineer. So if you're from testing team, the answer is using GUI tests for the whole software. If you develop some critical components, writing good unit tests are highly desired for your ...


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If you don't have access to Microsoft Test Manager as Luca suggested you can try uPerform (http://www.ancile.com/products/uperform-software/overview). It's pretty easy to pick up and run with. Not sure if there's a free version floating around, but my company provided it once and I still play around with it.


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I havent't used it myself, yet, but I recently stumbled across TimeSnapper (http://timesnapper.com/). It's a small windows app which runs in the background and takes a screenshot every few seconds. You can also ad notes. When you're done you can play back your session.


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You could try AutoIT and record macros as you test. If it were web browser only, using Selenium IDE's click-and-record would be just fine. In the past I have also kept Fiddler running as I tested. Those logs can be packaged and added to the tickets for the developers to comb over.



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