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As mentioned before, Applitools Eyes is a service which does exactly that. No more pixel comparisons and histograms and thresholds. Applitools have proprietary algorithms which analyse the screen and determine whether a screenshot matches the baseline. And they do a very good job at it. If you really want, you can also set a "human" level for comparison, ...


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Check out this tool https://github.com/NaviNet/Robot-AppEyes - a Robot Framework library that uses a cloud based provider to perform the 'human eyes' visual verification part. The expected results / baselines are set using a Web GUI it even allows for verification of a region based on its element locator - this I found very cool! Anyone using ...


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I must not agree with that: "The most efficient tool for testing the appearance of a website is still the human eye and brain." The most efficient way to do comparison of screenshots, whether it is of web pages, or 1000's of cups falling out of a plastic mold in an hour, on some factory, or anything else is by a software/machine. For industry purposes there ...


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Visual regression testing is getting a momentum as far as I can see. I started to collect information and do some basic testing with some of them. Here are a couple of places/tools you could check: Thoughtworks radar section on those tools: "This has given rise to a variety of visual regression testing tools, including CSS Critic, dpxdt, Huxley, ...


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We have started to trial this - http://code.google.com/p/qualitybots/ A project from the Google test team, it's quite a good blog to read. Although at the moment, we heavily test using crossbrowsertesting.com and saucelabs. We split the testing of our websites on different browsers in to three different categories. Functional - Ensuring key process and ...


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Must say never had success with this using an automated approach. In the end always ended up using in cash terms more expert resource than cheaper eye ball resource. The problem with the last project where I saw this tried was the environment and application changes just came too quickly to gain from unchanged repeated testing; despite the client thinking ...


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The most efficient tool for testing the appearance of a website is still the human eye and brain. That said, if you want or need to automate, image comparison is probably the least effective method because even with fuzzy logic it can generate far too many false positives. All it takes is a change in hardware (a different monitor or video card - this will ...


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I think the best single book to read for your situation is The Design of Everyday Things by Donald Norman. He's the other half Norman / Nielsen group linked in Peter's answer and a pioneer of the usability field. He talks about a lot of important concepts like affordances, mappings, forcing functions, and so many many others. The concepts in this book are ...


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Canonical source of knowledge about UI testing for last 20 years is http://useit.com. Jacob Nielsen is "guru of website usability" for those 20 years. Subscribe to his emails, and read his website.


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TestStack White: (partial open-source) White is an open-source framework for automating rich client applications based on Win32, WinForms, WPF, Silverlight and SWT (Java) platforms. It is .NET based and does not require the use of any proprietary scripting languages. Tests/automation programs using White can be written with whatever .NET language, IDE and ...


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I have read two great books written by Steve Krug, which I think are a must read for anyone doing usability testing. Don't Make Me Think Rocket Surgery Made Easy Both are easy to read and you should be able to read both in a day (or two). Maybe also ask the question on http://ux.stackexchange.com/, guess that community might have better getting started ...


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UI General Ask for a style guide, if you do not have one. The style guide should have a list with the allowed colors. Exactly values like hex code or something similar. Web Test in different browsers. Ask what browser they want to support. Look about market share and keep up-to-date. Create a priority list of browsers in three categories: ...


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Sikilu: Sikuli automates anything you see on the screen. It uses image recognition to identify and control GUI components. It is useful when there is no easy access to a GUI's internal or source code.


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I have worked on SilkTest and it is good. Also, as @Ankit mentioned there are many good UI testing tools, you can find here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_GUI_testing_tools



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