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1

It depends. Seriously, a lot depends on where you are (different countries have laws about what questions can't be asked), what kind of development process your team uses, your company culture, and the kind of applications your company produces. This isn't an exhaustive list, either. That said, if there are developers in the interview, you would probably ...


0

There isn't really a single answer to this; it differs greatly based on cost of living in your specific area, nearby similar opportunities, industry, and so on. However, one thing I would look at, if you really do want to make a career of testing, and possibly at this company in particular, is what is the career trajectory of testers at this company? ...


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Recruiter will have good idea about salary range for this (or any other) position. They care - they are paid "placement fee" worth 3-4 months of your salary. :-)


0

I would include tests for expired passwords.


3

Test automation is software development. And in my experience, it is approximately as difficult as writing the thing you're testing. So: If you were good at test automation, you will be good at software development. By "good at test automation," I mean that the tests you write are: Reliable (the information they report accurately describes something ...


3

Most straightforward option would be to start developing small little tools to help testing. Test automation, scripts analyzing logs, whatever your group need. You know your needs better than developer. Talk to your manager about possibilities of automation you see, and how you want to improve productivity of your team. More disruptive way will be to try ...


0

Testing is a full fledged activity which goes in parallel. They are like tracks of a Railway line, going the same direction but not intersecting with each other. It's possible to have QA professionals who are well versed in coding and likewise Developers with a good instinct for QA. If I were in your place, I would consider dev and coding experience as a ...


3

I would not worry to much about your background. Good software development is not learned in schools, since it is all about practice and more practice. Developers are in high demand, even people with poor development skills often find a job as a software developer. Some options: Tell your current employer you want to become a full-time developer and ask ...



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