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9

Welcome to SQA, Chris. First, regarding terminology, there are many terms for describing different kinds of testing. Everyone uses them differently. In some situations, those terms have specific meanings defined in contracts or regulatory documents. Usually though, the terms are just labels assigned to vague concepts that individuals (rather they realize ...


6

Craig - please don't feel you're not ready for the Weekend Testing sessions, they're absolutely intended to be a safe space for testers of all levels to try new things and make mistakes in a friendly and supportive environment where they can learn from them. We've had people who've never worked as a tester but who are interested in entering the profession ...


4

The objective is to resolve conflicts between components being integrated. Those kind of conflicts cannot be found during unit tests. The example of dishwasher of @user246 is very illustrative here. Type of conflicts you may encounter: A component transmits syntactically wrong or no data. The receiving component cannot operate or crashes ...


3

It seems like I'm the only person answering who's actually done the ISEB, so far. Don't waste money on a course - for the cost of attending a training course, you could sit the exam in one of the Prometric test centres 5 times over. The book and syllabus is more than enough, IMHO. I attended a course, but it really wasn't necessary to pass the exam. ...


2

If your employer is telling you to do the qualification, could you ask them for some training? The ISEB Foundation course is relatively easy to pass, and with instruction I think a 2-3 day intensive course would be enough to learn the syllabus. Training providers are abundant and can be found through all good search engines.


2

Full disclosure: I've not completed the ISEB certification, however prior to moving to development I managed a QA/Test team of 5, two of who had completed the foundation certification. My suggestions are: Remember, this is similar to every other qualification that you've ever done so the same basic principles hold true: Plan: Put together a study plan ...


2

I agree with user246 in regards to always confirming implied meaning of terminology. I was taught and have always used this reference wrt understanding the abstract "levels of testing" and wrote a bit about it here. In my current role I manage a team of testers that do 90% integration testing. What that means is that while we rely on our developers to do ...


1

Any tests that involve some subsystem that isn't part of your code base are considered integration tests. So this includes things like databases, the file system, web services and so on. So you should go back to your business requirements, and identify those requirements which use one of these "external" subsystems as part of their implementation. So, ...



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