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10

Similar questions have been asked a number of times. The general consensus is that UI automation tools such as Selenium are not a good choice for load testing. There are a number of reasons why, but the main one is that it is a LOT slower. You can easily spin up thousands of concurrent requests in a second in a tool like JMeter which to reproduce in ...


8

I have had some luck using Grinder. It is Java based but you can also write your scripts in Jython or Clojure. You said that you would like to take advantage of your team's current Selenium scripts and expertise performance testing. You did not describe your regression test scripts, but you may want to reconsider whether they are appropriate. In ...


5

Imagine a jackhammer with a Phillips-head screwdriver welded onto the handle. You could, in theory, use this modified jackhammer for screwing things together, but you probably wouldn't want to. JMeter is a tool for performance testing. Selenium is a tool for functional testing. I talk about the differences between the two kinds of testing here.


5

You could also check out Gatling, which is an open source stress tool based on akka. On the Gatling homepage, you'll find a direct comparison of how your test specification will look in Gatling vs. in JMeter. This might help you decide between these too. If you want to create massive amounts of load, I think there's nothing better than akka as an engine. ...


4

Does your company have a firewall proxy? I've run into this same issue with non-Vaddin apps, and resolved the issue by launching Jmeter with proxy info. From the command line, it looks like this: jmeter.bat -H proxyDomain -P proxyPort -u proxyUsername -a proxyPassword


4

Based on the answer and comments I had received what I wound up doing was: Use a Once Only Controller with a BeanShell Sampler to read the file into an array, then when I need to pull that data I just use a BeanShell PreProccessor with: import java.util.Random; Random random = new Random(); vars.put("MyChosenVariable", vars.get("AvailChoices_" + ...


4

JMeter is an excellent choice for your requirements. JMeter has a loop controller: http://jmeter.apache.org/usermanual/component_reference.html#Loop_Controller, you may want to add a counter or simply use a user defined variable. Both options will work. The easiest is using counters - Thread Group -- Loop A --- Counter 1 (Var name: C1) --- Loop B ---- ...


3

With Jmeter you can record both HTTP/HTTPS traffic, also there is Jmeter Chrome extension which can record traffic without configuring JMeter. To record web traffic in Jmeter: add Recording Controller into Test Plan add HTTP Proxy Server into WorkBench click Start button. open browser network settings change proxy settings to localhost:8080 remove ...


3

Resolved this by using JMeter's Duration Assertion as a child to the HTTP Request I wanted to time setting the Duration to Assert in milliseconds to the longest time allowable and Appy to as Main sample only. When this time is exceded the assert fails and the test gets marked as failed.


3

AirieFenix, welcome to SQA. Here are some possible problems: Your JMeter machine ran out of resources. Your server is overwhelmed. An intermediary (e.g. a proxy server or a load balancer on a DMZ machine) between your JMeter machine and the server is overwhelmed or is intentionally throttling network traffic. Here are some ways to narrow things down: ...


3

Randomizing the file BEFORE use is a much better approach. It will much more efficiently (especially in the case of significant amount of entries) to randomize the order of entries in your CSV file before the test - and then read prepared data sequentially, in way you like (via CSV Data Set e.g.). You can do the preparation using e.g. perl script or even ...


2

I find that using a combination of both gives you the most realistic results. As the posters have already mentioned Selenium requires a large number of servers to get a similar load to tools such as jmeter. However if you incorporate the browsermob proxy into your selenium tests ...


2

I want to add that is it possible to use Selenium for performance testing. Example: you have application with Web-UI and you want to measure UI reaction with one user but dealing with huge database. In this case JMeter is a bad choice, because it can't process Ajax requests. I've worked with such situation on my past project, and for such volume testing ...


2

I ll suggest Jmeter for Performance... As the name indicates Jmeter is one of the Java tools which is used to load testing client/server applications. Earlier it was used for testing Web Applications only however now-a-days its being used for other test functions. It is typically used to measure performance and to load test functional behavior of ...


2

jmeter I know it sounds like I'm beating a dead horse here, but this is the most commonly used open source tool. There is documentation all over the internet about using and setting it up. Additionally, if your company is a java shop, there are probably many developers who could help your team get started.


2

I have tried it and at times gotten some use out of it, the problem I have found when doing this is that often the scenarios I want to use for Functional Tests don't exploit enough of the system to really give me any meaningful performance metrics. My functional tool also doesn't allow this as it was chosen for its purpose, while my load test tool was ...


2

Have you added an HTTP Cookie Manager? Without one of these JMeter will not store any cookie information after you have logged in so your next request will not be as an authenticated user. To add an HTTP Cookie Manager: Right click on Test Plan Select Add -> Config Element -> HTTP Coookie Manager That all being said an HTTP 500 error implies ...


2

Is this a real-world question, or an academic one? Are you trying to find the answer for your particular application that you are testing? Or are you looking for a general formula as an answer? If you have an application that is already in production, then you can analyze the logs and determine the usage pattern of your 2000+ users. That will tell you how ...


1

According to the JMeter documentation, if you want to run JMeter behind a proxy server, you should launch JMeter with the following settings: -H [proxy server hostname or ip address] -P [proxy server port] -N [nonproxy hosts] (e.g. *.apache.org|localhost) -u [username for proxy authentication - if required] -a [password for proxy authentication - if ...


1

What you're describing is a workload model, a model of the measured or expected load on a system. Be wary about being fixated on the number of users, often a more useful metric to understand is the number of business transactions or the number of page/individual requests. Knowing how many users are on a system does not describe the load on the system, only ...


1

As far as I can tell, you are trying to answer the question "How do I take the information I have from usage of my current system - number of concurrent users and hits per second - and convert that into how many concurrent threads in JMeter?". I'll answer the best I can, if that is not your question, please correct me. Tools like JMeter don't allow you to ...


1

There are no tools that can provide you client-side rendering times. Client side rendering is not a measurable value, unless all of the devices accessing the system are identical in terms of hardware and network access to the SUT. However, It is completely viable to do a stopwatch test of the total page rendering time, as long as you communicate to the ...


1

A few tools have been mentioned in other answers that could help such as Dynatrace Ajax edition, Compuware Gomez and WebPageTest. Another tool I have used is Selenium Webdriver with some custom timers. There are a few caveats that you need to be aware of for this kind of performance measurement: The browser you are using will affect the JavaScript ...


1

I've read that HTTPWatch doesn't cover javascript rendering time (although can't confirm this). Compuware Gomez has a commercial tool. WebpageTest also has a version you can download and run on your servers to test a variety of aspects of the load. Chrome and Firefox also have web developer tools, where you can inspect the load t imes of the various ...


1

Check out HTTPWatch http://www.httpwatch.com/ It's a really good tool that sounds like it may meet your needs. I've used the free "Basic Edition" version for some client-side performance tests and analysis. And I've recommended it to some friends who use the "Professional Edition". Good stuff, and one I keep in my Tester's Toolbox ...


1

Check out DynaTrace Ajax edition. http://www.compuware.com/en_us/application-performance-management/products/ajax-free-edition/overview.html It's free, and gives a timeline that includes javascript execution & page rendering.


1

Performance tests and stress testing are different. I often re-use web service tests to add to my stress tests to add additional load to the system under test, but usually have a different set of performance tests to measure the performance of specific actions. Usually these are run in tandem because I want to know how the API performs under no load, ...


1

You can use Access Log Sampler, it allows to read URL's which are stored in text file. What you need to do, is: Grab URL's which you need from site. This can be made with different tools. For Windows I've used Xenu's Link Sleuth, but there are a number of alternatives both for Mac and Linux. Create new test plan in Jmeter and add Access Log Sampler to ...


1

I experienced issues when trying to scale to large numbers of users with Selenium Grid. I ended up going with Funkload because: It is significantly easier to scale and run tests quickly (without random hang-ups of browser instances) It has an easy-to-use recorder of http requests It makes it easy to load test API's by implementing the webunit Python ...


1

I wouldn't use JMeter personally. I would probably use SoapUI (executed by Maven) because it also fits nicely into Jenkins. SoapUI can do everything JMeter can, and more, especially with its Maven integration. I also prefer SoapUI for its Groovy integration and if you need to use BDD, you can integrate JBehave that way (with xUnit).



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