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In order to upload the file using JMeter as a proxy just drop the file to JMeter's "bin" folder. See Recording File Uploads with JMeter article for detailed explanation. If you're still looking for an alternative tool, here are some other free and open source solutions (all of them support record and replay) Grinder Gatling Tsung Remember that in the ...


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Try Zenoss Core, a powerful open source IT monitoring platform that monitors applications, servers, storage, networking and virtualization to provide availability and performance statistics. It also has a high performance event handling system and an advanced notification system.


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There's The Grinder, but I see it hasn't been updated in four years.


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Maybe you can use Fiddler, it also helps with monitoring requests and responses, and it's pretty easy to use


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I did a Google search for "JMeter automatic proxy". The first search result said this: PAC fiels[sic] contain javascript which is executed by the browser to decide which proxy URL they want to use. JMeter is not a browser so it does not run this code. The solution is simply to resolve which proxy this script returns and input this value into JMeter ...


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It seems JMeter doesn't support PAC files. Try an alternative recording solution i.e. JMeter Chrome Extension


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In general, if you're asking for a "good" method, it is recommended to create the main load using JMeter HTTP Request samplers and if needed run a single threaded Selenium test in parallel to monitor end-user experience and measure page rendering time, time of JavaScript execution, etc. If for some reason you need to stick to Selenium, first of all, have ...


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JMeter is made for generating load, and WebDriver is made for testing user interfaces. Neither is great for doing the other. You can configure JMeter to talk to WebDriver -- see this tutorial -- but you cannot just drop your existing WebDriver test into JMeter; you have to rewrite it in a way that only works with JMeter. Going the other direction, some ...


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Depending on the data, but jmeter can get and store variables to use, you can also set your own variables. It is quite an easy thing to do if you're familiar with basic jmeter. Here's some links on getting started: Basic getting started with HTTP Requests User Defined Variables


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You can build a single variable out of these data_1, data_2, etc. as follows: Add Beanshell PostProcessor after your Regular Expression Extractor Put the following code into the PostProcessor's "Script" area: StringBuilder dataBuilder = new StringBuilder(); dataBuilder.append("{\"data\":["); int ids = Integer.parseInt(vars.get("data_matchNr")); for (int ...


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Fixed by making the following changes: Changed PrivateKey privateKey = (PrivateKey) ks.getKey(privateKeyAlias, privateKeyPass.toCharArray()); TO: java.security.Key privateKey = (java.security.Key) ks.getKey(privateKeyAlias, privateKeyPass.toCharArray()); also moved KeyStore ks = KeyStore.getInstance(keystoreType); FileInputStream fis = new ...


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If your web service expects only client-side request SSL encryption and no other security mechanisms are in place you don't even need any scripting. Change your HTTP Request implementation to Java Add the following lines to system.properties file (lives in JMeter's "bin" folder) javax.net.ssl.keyStore=C:/jMeterTest/resources/abbazabba.jks javax.net.ssl....



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