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16

This answer should be seen as a supplement to Bruce's answer. I wanted to add a few more notes that wouldn't fit well in a comment. A lot of the tools you already might use for unit testing will likely be useful - NUnit, mocking frameworks, etc. Books to read: "How we Test Software at Microsoft", "Beautiful Testing", "Lessons Learned in Software ...


14

I think you're selling yourself short, here - you've said that in a language and skillset with which you're familiar and current you do well, but you're struggling with a language and skillset you have worked with in the past but where you've become rather rusty. That's normal. Seriously. Automation and programming are complementary skills but they're also ...


12

testerab, Great question. I'm a huge believer in these kinds of activities. You Would Enjoy Spending Time with Markus Gärtner When I think of the software testing community's response to code katas, I think of the prolific testing blogger Markus Gartner and his involvement in promoting Testing Dojos. They are collaborative, facilitated, group exercises ...


12

Katrina, It is possible to include some important approaches and goals for software testing that tend to be beneficial in creating effective test case scenarios in a wide variety of testing situations. They include: Don't repeat yourself (e.g., keep scenarios "DRY"); don't repeat combinations of test inputs more than you need to because you would find ...


11

Preface about my biases: I don't find the term "checking" evocative, and I don't find the distinction between checking and testing helpful. Given that... First, the word only suggests that checking is somehow trivial. I think checking is important. And creating useful checks is hard. Second, a key distinction between testing and checking is sapience. It ...


10

Could I suggest learning to test before diving into tools to automate tests and tools to manage them ? Read the books you have got, surf this site (and others such as Software Testing Club and SQA forums ) to get an idea of what people in the industry are doing and what problems they are facing.


10

For hacking WebDriver without real production purpose, you need to find some task that really motivates you. Don’t forget, WebDriver – is not only about test automation, people use the tool (not so widely) for many different purposes: crawling some data from websites, semi-automating real job-related tasks. For instance, a girlfriend of friend of mine ...


9

If I wanted to hand out one book to every tester entering my team, it would be Lessons Learned in Software Testing. In fact, I do hand out that book to everyone on the team! I don't always agree with all the points in the book. But I've found that it covers a wide-enough range of topics that it makes for great conversation around what we do, and the ...


8

http://feeds.softwaretestingclub.com/ is the official area we aggregate Software Testing Blogs and other sources. In the footer you can subscribe to separate topics by RSS (Blogs, Spanish, Events, Jobs, etc). Latest posts from the Blog section also appear on our main website and blog. I've lost track on how many blogs are listed, it is a lot and is ...


8

I would think that one thing you'll need to work on is changing your mindset. I have never been a coder/developer, but I do realize we think & approach a project in different ways. As Carmi said, be curious & ask questions, but remember it isn't our job to fix the problem. We can provide suggestions and ideas but ultimately the decision on what ...


8

Firstly, currently being ranked #1 on this site shows that you already have a good idea abou the basics and would get most positions based on what you know already. :-) The exact tools that you are going to use would vary job-to-job dependent on technology, so I would actually research and find the tools that you want to use, gain experience in those and ...


8

One of my favourites is Parkcalc ... Parkcalc is a real world application for calculating how much your parking is going to cost at the Gerald R. Ford international airport. It is also full of bugs, yet it works mostly. The requirements come in the form of the parking brochure. So you don't pound the real one into the gound there are a couple of self hosted ...


7

One book that I would recommend is Debugging by Thinking by Robert Charles Metzger This is a very unique book in that it approaches how to do testing the way Sherlock Holmes and other fictional detectives might of done it, looking at logic, psychology, engineering, etc. The book is pretty comprehensive and would be useful for a wide range of engineers both ...


7

"Good automated tester" and "terrible programmer" are judgments made in the context of a myriad of circumstances such as the subject's previous experiences, the task at hand, the simultaneous background work, the company environment, the team dynamics, and tools. One may be a good automated tester in one context and a terrible automated tester in another. ...


7

Java Bean, I think you may want to ask yourself a few questions first: do you want to be involved in testing or in programming? In my experience, colleges are usually less than stellar in the QA domain, and tend to assume that testing is "any warm body" and useful to familiarize someone with an application before they start coding with it. do you like ...


7

If it's true that you "need to do some fairly thorough testing before we can sell this as a professional product.", have you considered hiring an experienced contractor? You could hire someone to come in and do the testing. Or you could hire someone to come in and do just enough training that your group of non-professional testers could get some testing ...


6

Hey. I would suggest: test stuff, chat with testers, gain experience. Participate in WeekendTesting. This should help with any interview. Have you heard about TopCoder? Try to do testing competition (when it is available - not that often). I don't think that tools should be an issue for you. Coming from development, you should't have problems with ...


6

There are two supporting features that are great for testers. Technical ability Domain knowledge Technical ability is more along the lines of "I'm testing a game, and I know graphics libraries. I'm more likely to be able to spot rendering flaws." Domain knowledge "I'm an accountant, I will recognize a problem with accounting software faster than most ...


6

Check out testingpodcast.com They have over 200 quality software testing podcasts listed as of May, 2011. Series with more than 20 podcasts include Matthew Heusser's excellent "TWIST" (This Week in Software Testing), StickyMinds, Watir podcasts, Indianapolis Workshops on Software Testing, and RBCS. Categories ATI Podcasts (3) DevelopSense (1) ...


6

I don't think any specific language is better or worse than any other, although I will say (from experience) that going from Java or any other "pointerless" language to one that does have pointers is not a pleasant experience. Apart from that - the important parts of automation and coding are recognizing the problem that the code needs to solve, and being ...


6

I would recommend a slightly different approach. Rather than initially focusing on a particular language, I would recommend focusing on programming concepts. Some good books include Programming Langugae Concepts by Carlo Ghezzi, or Prelude to Programming: Concepts and Design by Elizabeth Drake. (Another great book is Programming in the Key of C Sharp by ...


6

There's The Secret Ninja Cucumber Scrolls from Gojko - I started off with this http://cuke4ninja.com/ I'm currently reading The Cucumber Book from Matt Wynne http://pragprog.com/book/hwcuc/the-cucumber-book The RSpec book might also be useful and a bunch of resources here http://mikbe.tk/2011/03/05/learning-cucumber-rspec/ ( I have no experience with ...


6

There's Weinbergs "Introduction to General Systems Thinking" book and his Volume 1 of "Quality Software Management" (two the other volumes are also probably appropriate). I've found a few good reads on this website "The Systems Thinking Review", e.g., "Planting potatoes the right way". Hopefully others will add to this, I'll be really interested to see ...


6

I've successfully completed the AST's BBST Foundations course, and a couple of colleagues have just completed it (and enjoyed it!). It is possible to self-study with the material, but I'd definitely recommend doing the AST course if you can. (There is a self-study student workbook in preparation, due out late 2012/early 2013). When you do the AST course, ...


6

I've been at companies where someone transitioned from another dept into a Testing / QA position and it was done intra-company. They found a position open, called the department manager and impressed him/her enough to get hired - without much experience. Does your current company provide that opportunity for you? It might be an easy way in. Like Phil K says ...


5

Ahmet, I agree your thought of a wiki for testing techniques could be a valuable idea for software testers. The best testing technique repositories that I am aware of are of the "dead tree" variety. Lee Copeland's "A Practitioner's Guide to Software Test Design" is the best book on the topic in my view. Available only in book format. Also well worth ...


5

Craig - please don't feel you're not ready for the Weekend Testing sessions, they're absolutely intended to be a safe space for testers of all levels to try new things and make mistakes in a friendly and supportive environment where they can learn from them. We've had people who've never worked as a tester but who are interested in entering the profession ...


5

I would suggest: http://angryweasel.com/blog/ http://www.testingmentor.com/imtesty/ http://testapprentice.com/ http://testing.gershon.info/


5

I kind of have the opposite experience: I learned some coding first then became a tester. My advice is that any programming/coding experience is beneficial for testing. Any way you can better understand what the application is doing in front of you, the better you can test it. Plus, specific tools and languages come and go in use and popularity: learning the ...


5

Short answer: - I use them to evaluate my understanding of a product, and to communicate my understanding of the product. Secondary (test) use is to walk through the CLD and ask typical tester "what if?" questions. Longer answer: You can use CLDs pretty much as designed - as a method for understanding the system you are testing, including assumptions as ...



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