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I came across similar requirement i used core java - connection url api. It was very faster String myString = null; URLConnection urlConn = null; try{ URL url = new URL("enter url here"); urlConn = url.openConnection(); urlConn.setUseCaches(false); HttpURLConnection httpConn = (HttpURLConnection)urlConn; InputStream is=null; if ...


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It is a very broad question. You may use some of these tools: Agile/Scrum project management tool Version One. They have free and paid versions. I find this project management to be very effective and user friendly. When choosing for bug tracking tool, find the best match for your team. Jira is one of the best one out there. Mobile/Device Testing You can ...


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I think that you should be able to use Apache JMeter for it. JMeter acts on protocol level so in any case it will be faster than using a browser. Besides JMeter is designed for load testing so you will be able to check all the URLs in matter of seconds. Components you'll need are: HTTP Request CSV Data Set Config


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A nice automation question. This question has already been asked on Stack Overflow, in Check the server response code, then export to csv. I don't know how good your python coding skills are, but most of the code is given on that page. It seems to aim to achieve exactly what you want to do. It probably will need tidying up and debugging first though :-( ...


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When you have question about usability, you will not go wrong starting your search from useit.com website by Jacob Nielsen and his group, which provides whitepapers (and free summaries) about usability testing for more than a decade. Treasure-trove of good information, stuff like: Responsive Web Design (RWD) and User Experience Responsive Design and ...


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Or just code it in your favorite language- Python, Perl, JAVA etc. I estimate it in less than an hour of coding, verifying it and having a cup of coffee


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Response dive design testing; as the name suggests its about testing how a piece of software responds to various platforms and screen sizes. Platforms may include hardware, os and browsers. For example; you are testing a website then you may find that the design is not the same in Firefox I stalled in Linux or Mac OS than that in windows. Similarly you will ...


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There are several solutions. The simplest would probably be to list your links in HTML format, and then run that page through a link checker tool. Here's an open source example. Another solution is to set up a testing project in Visual Studio (or a similar environment). You can provide source data in CSV format, see this topic. It's fairly easy to have ...


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Basically when you are going to test responsive design then make sure it works in all resolutions , Os , browsers and devices. Testing diff. is just only one that you must focus on layout that how each and every element display in diff environment. There are lots of tool available on market which can help you to do responsive design testing but according ...


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Googling this question gives multiple sites where there are some example questions or mock tests for preparing for ISTQB foundation level certification. They illustrate well one of the problems in this kind of certification. None of the sites I found explained why this would be the correct answer (or asked for the applicant to explain it, for that matter). ...


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what are some good strategies for doing QA, striking a balance between thoroughness and efficiency? Focus on priority and correctness. Find something important to prove to be working, like 'completing the registration process yields a new account' Describe explicitly how to execute the process and verify the result (the test case for correctness) ...


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The basic strategy is risk assessment - where might the problems be and what will affect the users wallet? 1) Do you know what your users are using - are you going to bother testing on IE8? You say you don't want to test 10-15 browsers - where did you get that number from? If you developing on Chrome then no need to test on Chrome, test on FF and Safari and ...


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You think it's impossible! Not really. Here is how to accomplish this. Short and sweet. QAs are involved in pointing the stories. You decide in sprint planning/refinement if any automation needs to be done on the story. Everyone including QAs know the effort it's going to take. So, you point them keeping that in mind. And, you mention that as an acceptance ...


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You need to redefine what the definition of "done" is for a ticket. A ticket is not complete until manual testing, documentation, and automation are done. Project Managers might get upset at first but it's not hard to win an argument when you tell them the increase quality means.


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If your management is so focused on short time returns that it will not invest in increasing your skills to improve your productivity - you should do it anyway in your own free time. All tools and documentation are free, you just invest your time. Of course your progress would be slower, but after some time you should be able to show some results, proving ...


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To echo others, it depends and I'd say that it largely depends on the culture at your company. It ultimately comes down to a trade-off between developer time and tester time. The more time you spend digging into the root cause of an issue, the less time you'll spend looking for other issues. However, you will save the developer some time because he/she ...


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I won't take anything away from what has already been stated, but I noticed that your question implies that your company may still be in the "start up" phase. If your Marketing and Executive offices intend to go "IPO" ("Initial Public Offering" meaning: you'll be listed on the stock market), then you may have some work to do. Before that happens, you must ...


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As others have said, it depends. My usual method works like this: I find something that doesn't seem right: If it's really obvious (a typo in a high-profile part of a site, an error message that gives the line of code that's failed), I'll check with a developer to see if they're working on that code right now (this is often the case in agile or other ...


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It's not necessary for QA to do root-cause analysis for every defect they found. It's up to circumstances. And for the level of drill-down, I did not drill to the level of source-code when I tested a Unix binary application. But I did html/css root-cause analysis when I tested a website. As a view of user I represent, I access only the information that a ...


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Nobody can really answer it since it depends. Depends on your qualifications, your and your team work load, the dev team work load, the complexity of the issue etc. I work now in a combined engineering type team and I still can't give a definite answer to your question, your best bet is to discuss this with your colleagues and managers.


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are you familiar with 37 Sources for Test Ideas ?



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