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2

The answer was buried in some MSDN documentation that was challenging to google-reach: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/visualstudioalm/archive/2013/09/16/using-internet-explorer-11-and-not-able-to-record-a-web-performance-test-successfully.aspx Also ... don't forget to enable the test tool. Might have to check a couple places.


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To answer your question simply, use this tool from WebPerformance.com. I agree with the other answers/comments that 10 is a pretty low number. The lowest I even consider a stress test would be 100 as that is the default connection pool size for SQL Server 2008 that I have actually seen on a production server. The low hanging fruits for optimization will ...


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without Think Time This is critical to the question you are asking. Can I ask why you're performing a test without think time? In the real world, users cannot type in data and click submit at the rate an automated script can. If you do not insert timers and pauses into your automated script, you are not really measuring performance under 10 real world ...


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That sounds very underwhelming to be honest. But it is not a bad thing though because you might have spotted something bad. I would actually let the load run for a while, check which processes are eating up the resources and actually do a bit of debugging to see what`s going on inside. If that is the expected behavior of the app.(which i doubt) try using ...


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All of the classical big tools, such as Mercury/HP LoadRunner, Silk/Borland/Microfocus Performer & Rational/IBM Performance Tester all have strong client-server testing backgrounds. Most of these tools began in the two tier client-server arena and support collection (recording) or development in dozens (in once case over 30) difference interfaces. ...


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Take a look at LoadRunner from HP or Cloud Test Lite from SOASTA. You can pull your JavaScript code into either tool to use to prep your XHR requests. Both tools have an excellent track record for both REST and SOAP support as well as emulation of standard browser capability for cookies and the ability to extract data from a response to place into a ...


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Some of your goals are unrealistic/unachievable. An example is the 10 millisecond field to field transition time. Most Monitors in desktop use refresh at the 60hz rate, which leaves each frame on the screen for 16-17ms. Some studies suggest that the barrier for human perceptibility is about 50ms. So, to even test this you would need specialized hardware ...


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I've always favoured 'Night Crawler' as a name for mascots.


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I have extensive experience of using mascots in agile test teams, including many forms of soft toy. May I suggest Pooky - Garfield's much abused plush companion.


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I'm a strong believer of the approach of running performance tests on production environment complete replica as it will allow to cover the following cases: scalability issues interoperability issues network issues etc. Once you encounter a performance problem, bottleneck, degradation additional investigation will be required to get to the bottom of ...


2

This is a black art. It is hard to test for concurrency problems in a methodical way. In other words, it is hard to construct functional test cases that will verify whether concurrency works correctly. We tend to find concurrency problems as a side-effect of load testing. I think it is a good idea to combine as many kinds of operations as you can in the ...


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Not sure if you have dismissed JMETER already, or if I'm missing anything. If not, you should probably give it a spin, since it's a free alternative to others.


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Beyond the regular web functionality like login, navigation through the site, launch I would suggest using hardware simulation to fake mouse and keyboard inputs. I think that the easiest solution will be one of the single board computers like Raspberry Pi, see this thread for example



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