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10

To answer the question "are they worthwhile?", you need to explore: How expensive (in terms of time and money) are they to create, maintain, and execute? What value are these tests providing? Are they finding bugs? Providing confidence? Are there other, less expensive, ways to provide similar value? I once worked at a software company which built desktop ...


10

You could setup personas which are designed around real world of users. We have found this quite useful and it really helps to provide a fresh perspective e.g. Today I'm going to be Andy, the super user of the system. Andy is very sharp with numbers and is the user that is responsible for the administration of the system. He enjoys watching sports on ...


10

Being QA Manager with about 3 years of experience, I just give my team mates testing tasks, which are NOT related to software, e.g.: Compose test cases for blender / vacuum cleaner / etc. - any kind of familiar device / equipment. This results in brain refreshing, and for the cost of 2-4 hours I get team "reloaded")) The same is applicable for testing such ...


7

I think the simple answer is, do something else for a while. Our jobs require a lot of repetition, and we automatically develop habits in response to repetition. That behavior is a deeply ingrained survival technique; habits allow us to do things quickly without thinking them through. Sometimes those habits allow us to discover new things, but other times ...


7

Introduction (This should be brief, something like why we test our applications and why it's important) Scope and limitations of our Test platform Resources (Software ex Selenium, Test Scenarios, Links for tutorials) Procedures (How to register a bug or tests priority) But in general the documentation changes according to whom it is intended for, ...


6

You could try the 'tours' concept and try out different tours of the software. I'd also disagree somewhat with your premise - the more you use a program the more you notice any slight changes. You also understand more how all the parts interact which in turn gives more ideas. I think at the start you may notice more but they are shallower than ones you find ...


4

Maybe an indirect answer, but one way would be to get actual fresh minds. This is the idea behind usability testing, bug bashes, alphas, private and public betas, etc. Another idea would be to rotate from a staffing perspective to different products/features.


4

I found this document based on IEEE-829 and have used it for rough guidance, but remove categories that seem like overkill for my team or merge categories that seem similar. Since I started doing this, I've received many compliments on the clarity of my test plans. I use a wiki for documentation, which makes it easy for users to jump to the sections they ...


4

At the risk of flogging a dead horse, this is one of those context-free questions that is tough to answer without information specific to your needs. I won't rehash what people have described about commonly used environments, but I would like to offer a few things to consider. As with most things, there are no best practices, there is what is appropriate ...


3

I am not sure what you meant by "role" here and some elaboration would help in identifying what exactly you are looking for. Nonetheless, we usually have have the DTAP enviroments for our sprint/release cycle: D - Dev (here you can pair with devs and help write junits and do dev-box testing before commits.) T - Test (the test environment where the ...


3

One approach is to actively recruit team members and other stakeholders for testing of the product. I have found that it is useful to try different approaches and use whatever works best with each person, which can include: Paired testing with a code developer (emphasize the thrill of having a function work on the first build :) ) Asking a content ...


3

You may want to look at TFS 2012. It now has a Kanban board in the tool. There is a preview version of the TFS service in the cloud available if you want to check it out. When I looked into it for TFS 2010, I was only able to find free Kanban tools that did not link to TFS, or paid ones like Urban Turtle that could actually integrate with TFS 2010.


3

I would say why only create a document. You can create a mind map or a any other visual representation of what are you trying to convey. Its a nice way to get your message across and won't cost you any words at all. I have used test strategy to communicate in essence, only the following things What you plan to do ? How you are going to do it ? If I am able ...


2

I have moved my team completely away from test strategy documents. We are using mindmaps instead as they paint a great picture of what you are trying to test and allow for quick conversations with development and analysts. You can then continue to flesh them out and move to test ideas. Excellent blog about this - ...


2

It's interesting that you mention it's important for as many people as possible in the organization to read and remember your test strategy. I infer that by default, people will not read or remember your test strategy. That tells me you want a document that is both instructive and persuasive. If you want someone to read all the way to the end, you ought ...


2

Find out what qualities are important and make sure these are tested. For example: How many users and what is their usage ? Answers to this will help work out your approach to performance testing, it might not be needed Will the website take payments ? Store personal details - answers to these will help determine the level of security testing Which ...


2

At such an early stage a good first step may be to arrange with the developer(s) who will be working on the UI and asking for little things to ease the testability of the site with automation tools e.g. Relevant identifiers on the web page elements. Specifically addressing User Experience, Security and performance you may not be particularly well served by ...


2

Answering your question requires knowing why you were asked to write those tests. Unlike solving applied math problems, we usually do not write automated UI tests for the sheer pleasure or the intellectual challenge. I assume you were asked to write them, in that style, for a reason. If there is a reason to believe the UI is particularly buggy and that it ...


1

1 What are the most common set of environments and [2] best practices for each environment? (1) System Test, UAT, Performance Test, Staging are all classical environments (2) Best Practices is a harder one :-) .. Here is a cool Test Environment Maturity Model TEMMI .. Other than that my advice is this ... "Understand your environments .. Without ...


1

You could also change your testing approach. In my experience, 90% of time spent testing is Exploratory. this tends to get dull and repetitive. What I then started doing was changing my point of view or testing strategy. Try something in the lines of BVA. (Boundary Value Analysis). Obviously certain test strategies wont work on all types of software. It ...


1

We used to use TFS Workbench before we upgraded to TFS 2012. Its a Windows based application but used to work well.


1

You might take a look at this project on Codeplex for a WIP board that you could use in as a Kanban board. It appears to be process agnostic. It does not appear to have moved out of Beta 2 so I am not sure what the level of stability is or if it is getting any work done on it any longer. It does integrate with TFS 2010 though. Visual WIP ...


1

Perhaps no link with TFS, but consider to use Trello: it's free and worth it!


1

Given the shabby usability of the average non-profit web site, you might consider donating your time in a different way: write a manual test plan so that your friend (or someone else) could look for bugs, and then run a few informal usability tests. You might end up with a higher-quality site.


1

IMHO, no. Here's why: Depending upon your UI, cost of implementing will probably be high. Don't forget to sum the cost of maintaining it when your UI changes in the next release and so on. This itself should warrant second thoughts. UI tests can be flaky. In my experience accuracy of UI test cases is pretty low. I'd imagine this to get worse with brute ...


1

I agree with Aniket, this kind of exhaustive UI test is not worth it. Another thing to consider: Awhile back, I inherited a manual test case plan from someone who left the company. He had been doing things like checking the list sorting behavior in every area of the app. He wasn't a programmer and didn't understand that the code behind the dropdown box for ...



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