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13

In my experience, the best developer/testers bring what I call the boredom herusitic to software testing. Inother words, they often automate rote tasks so they can focus on testing and analysis of the software. An example I use often is the "add contact" feature in an instant messaging or email client. To test the feature, I'd need to try long names, ...


9

You describe several skills that are advantageous in a tester: analytical skills, the ability to find flaws, and tolerance for repetition. You also seem to be interested in testing. A potential disadvantage from your own candid admissions: reluctance to take ultimate responsibility and, to a lesser degree, discomfort with starting something from scratch. ...


9

Personally I find that tester who codes in addition to great testing skills is much more effective than the non-technical equivalent. A techical tester can esentially bring more "weapons to bear" on testing problems than you could without those skill sets. Some examples: Need to generate some test data? Write a tool to do it. Need to check security access ...


8

I never see common agreement on any software-related titles. In some shops where I have worked "Architect" implies a thinker, not a doer. For QA Architect, it means someone who thinks about QA, researches and suggests improved methods and metrics. Sometimes it's someone who trains others. In other shops, "Architect" just means "very Senior". It's the ...


8

I've had success using tester/developers for code review of production code. I've found that developers review code thinking, "Will this work", while testers review code thinking "In what ways could this not work". I've also found that most testers discover new test ideas while reviewing production code. I wrote a paper on the experiences of our team in ...


8

I tend to prefer allowing anyone in any capacity to log defects on any team I am a part of. It helps build a sense of ownership of quality in the entire team, which is as it should be, every team member regardless of role should equally own and care about quality. It is a different story when people outside of the project team are entering defects, I would ...


8

Without being flippant, this sounds like you've got a serious communication problem in the team. Given the limited timeframe, here's a few things to consider: everyone in the team needs to know what a good bug report looks like everyone in the team needs to search for a bug report on the issue they're seeing before they write up a bug report. This means ...


7

Like Sam points out experience with SQL and/or with MySQL will greatly depend on the project and/or the company with whom you hope to work. SQL skills are one aspect of Software Testing that focuses specially on technology. James Bach, an expert in the field of Software Testing with 20+ years experience, published a Tester's Syllabus for those who are ...


7

Java Bean, I think you may want to ask yourself a few questions first: do you want to be involved in testing or in programming? In my experience, colleges are usually less than stellar in the QA domain, and tend to assume that testing is "any warm body" and useful to familiarize someone with an application before they start coding with it. do you like ...


6

Welcome to SQA. I assumed you're a tester :-) In short, do devs like being bothered by testers? Well, that depends on many things. If you find a bug and won't bother a developer to fix it or answer area around it, she might bother you to explain it better later, when you're busy. So it is in interest of both of you to find the right time. Finding ...


6

I am working under the assumption that you would be familiar with the language the tools are being written in. If the team you are on already is writing unit tests a good place to start might be with them. Talk to the developers that are writing the unit tests and get an idea for how the underlying code is working. In the process of doing this start ...


5

I would start with what you have, the inputs and outputs, then start questioning. I like to go through a bunch of what if's, such as in your case "what if the database is unavailable?" or "what if the mail queue is full?" or something like that. If you can't come up with questions like that, then ask the developers "what didn't you test that you think I ...


5

A tester can add value to the product and development team by making/influencing key software design choices even before coding starts. Testers with programming background can understand and explore possible software design choices for better code testability and they can determine "if the code is fit for use?" Design choices like "Dependency Injection" and ...


5

It's always a challenge to change careers. And as a hiring manager, a red flag always go off when someone wants to change careers and get hired onto my team. I see a few here. You say that you are burned out as a developer. That's understandable. So are you considering QA as "easier"? Less likely to cause burnout? Be prepared to discuss this in depth ...


4

A few years ago I made this same choice. I was a tester, moved into C++ C# development, then moved back to testing. I still like writing code and there are some coding opportunities in testing. The main reason I switched back was that in development I found the thing I got the most enjoyment from was bug fixing. I know that sounds somewhat trivial but I ...


4

Some general skills carry over very well. 99% of it comes down to the mindset. My testing career started in electronics manufacturing. For most of the assemblies, there were only a few pre-determined tests that were run on them that were always black and white in regards to pass/fail. The only time that we were given the chance to be creative was with ...


4

Not everyone on the team needs the same skills, and if you already have enough development capacity you might be more valuable for the overall results if you take up other tasks. When working together with testers in an automation project, developers can focus on the development part if there is someone else who: Really understands the application and the ...


4

There's no one true way to do this, but there are some common things you can do to get an overview of the system you're working with. My approach is to start with a series of questions (not in any particular order) Who - who is the application intended for? Knowing who the users are tells you a lot about how they're likely to want to use the software and ...


3

This depends entirely on preferences of the programmers. Some don't want to be interrupted, others don't mind it at all. Some want to discuss problems before they are reported to make sure they are problems and to provide more information in the bug report, others are happy just to receive as clear report as possible. One team can of course have all types. ...


3

Although I like Joe's answer, I've seen this fail a few times. I've seen it happen a few times where for a 'quick fix' a developer has put in javascript redirects on page load when they don't have access to the server itself. In these kind of circumstances, I've found even using something like Selenium useful. It could be as simple as the following; ...


3

At the risk of sounding too much "me too", I'd say that if your associate is able to use software well and enjoys the puzzle-work of QA, there's a good chance they'll go well in software QA. Some of the big differences between non-software and software QA are things like: Software tends not to be able to start from a clean, error-free state. Since a piece ...


3

I moved to Software QA from a non-IT role. My prior QA was airline tickets and reservations. Please see prior questions on this Stack Exchange forum regarding what makes a skilled Tester / QA Analyst. Listed will be the traits (competencies) that are required at the very core of the heart of a passionate Tester. Show them to your friend, who can then ask ...


3

First of all, it is understandable that a former developer might approach testing in terms of individually testable layers or sub-components. However, as a tester, if you do nothing else, you must verify that the finished product behaves correctly when exercised using whatever interfaces the end-user will use. Everything else is secondary to that -- ...


3

I'd be intellectually dishonest if I didn't admit that part of this is simply wanting to pass the buck instead of being the one ultimately responsible for something. In SQA you are more responsible for a feature than a developer is. When nasty bugs make it to production, all eyes are on you and you must do an RCA or explain how it was missed. If it ...


3

SQL is specific to the project you're working on. Knowledge of SQL may or may not be applicable to a SQA position. I would say there are probably more SQA positions than not that don't have that requirement. The most important thing for an SQA position is logical problem solving skills. Especially for entry level SQA positions most of the focus will be ...


3

I agree with everything in Dan's answer. There are a few options on how to automate testing of the web service layer. You can use gui tools such as SOAPUI or JMeter, or you can use libraries such as Rest Sharp or a java alternative. I often prefer to start with an API or library for my automation, but recently I've been having success with JMeter and ...


3

Given your background and what you've said about wanting to move towards development, I'd suggest the following: You can download the web developer version (with highly limited functionality) of Visual Studio free. You should be able to get that for VB - which in its current version is likely to still be close enough to VB 5 for you to work fairly easily. ...


3

I understand you have problems with test automation because you are not much skilled (yet) in programming. And it hurts. I believe the more something hurts, the more resistance something offers, the more you need to practice that until the moment things become a routine for you and you become more effective. There are no workarounds and shortcuts to master ...


3

Depending on your project you may also assert visual consistency, for example in a website that shows breadcrumbs the level of nesting should be consistent with the displayed breadcrumbs. Maybe a 'minimum width' for buttons/text inputs/etc. You may also probe performance and measure how fast is the site loading. Whether these are expected of you or not is ...


3

Anyone who has access to the application should be able to file bugs/defects. Defects should be filed in a bug tracker with a status new. New defects should be verified and extended (With at-least a reproduction path) Defect should be added at the top of the backlog (Keep a no defect policy when being Agile) Products Owners should monitor new incoming ...



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