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12

I think the fundamental difference between the tester and the developer is the difference between synthesis and analysis. The developer synthesizes code. He builds up things, putting pieces together and figuring out fun and unique ways of combining those distinct little bits to do wonderful and amazing things. Testers are all about analysis. Once it has ...


9

For the most part, I've gotten by with running simple SELECT queries with various WHERE filters. With my current position, though, I'm finding that adding more complex JOINs are necessary to really get what I need out of the database. I think you are answering your own question here. Basically - "it depends". Sometimes the position requires just a ...


8

"I believe one contributing factor is a matter of perspective, that a great tester approaches software in a different way than a developer." I agree! And I think that's one of the primary factors which allows testers to add significant value. Here's something I wrote a while back: In my experience, developers tend to be optimistic folks, while testers ...


8

Although I completely agree with TristaanOgre's answer, I do have another piece to add. Developer's are often (even if they don't realize it), emotional attached to their code. They've spent hours/days/weeks, sometimes years putting it together. They have taken what someone wanted and (normally) crafted those requirements into a working, and often elegant ...


8

The pay depends on a lot of factors (as anyone would tell you): The work you are hired to do. If you work better than others, you are not likely to get a pay hike right away. Even in a good company, they will wait for a year to see your performance, and you might be promoted sooner. The industry - For QA jobs, a technology company is likely to pay more ...


7

Java Bean, I think you may want to ask yourself a few questions first: do you want to be involved in testing or in programming? In my experience, colleges are usually less than stellar in the QA domain, and tend to assume that testing is "any warm body" and useful to familiarize someone with an application before they start coding with it. do you like ...


5

This is going to sound crazy, but... it depends. What you want from a tester who will be doing a whole lot of routine, pre-defined tests (one hopes this isn't the case, but sometimes it is necessary) manually isn't what you want from a tester who's going to need to handle a highly dynamic system. Assuming you're looking for someone who will be good with ...


5

Testers are different from not only developers, but also everyone else in a software organization, because they are the only people whose primary mission is to figure out how the product could fail, and not how to make the product suceed. Developers spend their spare moments trying to figure out how the code can be refactored to be cleaner or an elegant ...


4

Development and testing are two diametrically opposed disciplines. Development is all about construction, and testing is all about demolition. Effective testing requires a specific mindset and approach where you are trying to uncover developer mistakes, find holes in their assumptions, and flaws in their logic. Most people, myself included, are simply ...


4

Some general skills carry over very well. 99% of it comes down to the mindset. My testing career started in electronics manufacturing. For most of the assemblies, there were only a few pre-determined tests that were run on them that were always black and white in regards to pass/fail. The only time that we were given the chance to be creative was with ...


4

You accepted $42K, so it's fair. Otherwise you would have rejected the offer and sought employment elsewhere, right? The fact that you are doing the same work, or more, than someone else has no impact on your pay. If you think you are being mistreated, then leave and see if you can find a company that is willing to pay you more. Otherwise, stop worrying ...


3

At the risk of sounding too much "me too", I'd say that if your associate is able to use software well and enjoys the puzzle-work of QA, there's a good chance they'll go well in software QA. Some of the big differences between non-software and software QA are things like: Software tends not to be able to start from a clean, error-free state. Since a piece ...


3

I moved to Software QA from a non-IT role. My prior QA was airline tickets and reservations. Please see prior questions on this Stack Exchange forum regarding what makes a skilled Tester / QA Analyst. Listed will be the traits (competencies) that are required at the very core of the heart of a passionate Tester. Show them to your friend, who can then ask ...


3

Proficiency in SQL is just a start, there is something more that just being competent with the SQL syntax: Select, From, Join, Where, Order by, etc. A good Software tester in a job requiring DB skills needs to be willing to learn from the Developers and DBAs in the shop. The tester should want to refine and improve their DB data mining skill continuously. ...


3

If I am looking for a tester for either a database or for a heavily data driven application then the stronger they are with SQL the better. I think not only should they be comfortable with writing queries including JOINS, UNIONS etc, but they need to have a good understanding of what some of the different performance implications are around inserts and ...


3

It seems like I'm the only person answering who's actually done the ISEB, so far. Don't waste money on a course - for the cost of attending a training course, you could sit the exam in one of the Prometric test centres 5 times over. The book and syllabus is more than enough, IMHO. I attended a course, but it really wasn't necessary to pass the exam. ...


2

If your employer is telling you to do the qualification, could you ask them for some training? The ISEB Foundation course is relatively easy to pass, and with instruction I think a 2-3 day intensive course would be enough to learn the syllabus. Training providers are abundant and can be found through all good search engines.


2

Full disclosure: I've not completed the ISEB certification, however prior to moving to development I managed a QA/Test team of 5, two of who had completed the foundation certification. My suggestions are: Remember, this is similar to every other qualification that you've ever done so the same basic principles hold true: Plan: Put together a study plan ...


2

If you work in a company using intensively with SQL databases, like in enterprise systems or online shops, you will very likely need at least basic skills in SQL, at least to create some test data in the database, to check results and so on. At least some DML knowledge, SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE, will come handy sooner or later. But keep in mind it's ...


2

The heart of development is creation. -- The heart of testing is science. All Software testing is testing the hypothesis "Is this software suitable to ship to the customer." There are a lot of nuances, testing has a lot of art to it and it's all about testing assumptions. Your development mindset should be "How can I best solve the costomer problem with ...


2

The one thing I would add is something I learned from Whittaker's 10 Commandments; Thou shalt hold thy developers' sins against them I use this thought every day. If I get code & I know that developer leaves error messages until the end, I'm going straight there to make sure they were not forgotten. If I know someone has had trouble with handling ...


2

First, congrats on reaching out to others in your field. Its important when making decisions to have as much information as possible. When dealing with pay (or any other testing / job related problem) I've found having a good network, i.e. having friends or more experienced people in similiar positions with whom I can talk to about anything, is a great ...


2

Just as you would for any other role in your software development company, you decide what you want the new hire to be able to do, then seek people qualified to fulfill that role. If you already know that you want to hire a "QA person", then you must have some sort of idea about what this QA person will do? There are no magic traits/questions here, just as ...


1

I'm a workmanlike Tester who's had the good fortune to work with some excellent people over the years. When I hire people, there are some key characteristics I look for: Eye for detail This is the obvious one. Testers need to be able to see the little details that others miss. You know those Facebook questions? The ones that go: Spot the mitsake : 1 ...


1

You should be getting the tester to "think like a tester'. The way I like to do this is to give them a scenario and then have them come up with test cases for how they would test something. If you want some examples, Trish Khoo and I covered this topic at length in this episode of our testing podcast ... ...


1

TL;DR Developer = Let's make something! Tester = Let's blow it up! When I took my first job in QA, I would describe what I did to people this way: I have a hammer and screwdriver and someone has just pointed me at a grandfather clock with instructions to tear it apart to find out how it works and, and...(this is the best part) I don't have to put it back ...



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