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Visual regression testing is getting a momentum as far as I can see. I started to collect information and do some basic testing with some of them. Here are a couple of places/tools you could check: Thoughtworks radar section on those tools: "This has given rise to a variety of visual regression testing tools, including CSS Critic, dpxdt, Huxley, ...


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We have started to trial this - http://code.google.com/p/qualitybots/ A project from the Google test team, it's quite a good blog to read. Although at the moment, we heavily test using crossbrowsertesting.com and saucelabs. We split the testing of our websites on different browsers in to three different categories. Functional - Ensuring key process and ...


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Must say never had success with this using an automated approach. In the end always ended up using in cash terms more expert resource than cheaper eye ball resource. The problem with the last project where I saw this tried was the environment and application changes just came too quickly to gain from unchanged repeated testing; despite the client thinking ...


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The most efficient tool for testing the appearance of a website is still the human eye and brain. That said, if you want or need to automate, image comparison is probably the least effective method because even with fuzzy logic it can generate far too many false positives. All it takes is a change in hardware (a different monitor or video card - this will ...


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It depends on what sort of resources you can afford. Test Automation, done well, is not a part time effort. If you can't afford to have a Toolsmith on your team to work on the Automation Framework you will need help, or expect it to take a long time, or expect it to take effort to keep it going as it gets reprioritized. While most Testers do not spend a ...


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Here's how I would approach this kind of situation: Unit tests - Evangelize the living daylights out of unit testing. Any kind of business logic automation should be handled by unit tests, as should any other automated tests whose goal is to check the functionality of a single unit of code. This is developer-level code, but tester guidance is essential if ...


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Extending and maintaining automated tests costs time, but if your team are slaves to updating tests you are doing it wrong. :) One of the biggest reasons to create automated test coverage is to create a fast feedback cycle loop. Letting the test-team fix the tests afterwards slows down this process and will always lag behind. There is a high risk the tests ...


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Why either/or? Work as a team with testers providing test ideas and expertise that the devs can code up. I would also shy away from an emphasis on GUI automation and get the devs working at a unit/system level unless they are doing this already


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I think it is the right decision to let the QA Engineers develop the test automation. Developers aren't testers and do not have the know-how to create good GUI test cases. But you can involve the developers in the development of test automation, if needed. They have useful knowledge about programming and can help you to setup the infrastructure of your test ...



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