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8

Yes, it is fair to report bugs, no matter how you have detected them. You may find that the developers need the steps to reproduce the problem, in which case you may have to do more work before you can expect the bug to be fixed. A bug found by reading the code is still a bug. (Unless it's not actually a bug because you misread the code, or didn't ...


8

I don't think fairness is the issue. More important: Would a report be useful? For the web service usage, the usefulness of your report depends partly on the scope of your review. Given the code you reviewed, you have a concern. But perhaps other code (outside the scope of your review) prevents the problematic scenarios you're concerned about. ...


5

At my current workplace, we don't distinguish between different ways that bugs are discovered. If a developer expects the test team to test the bug fix, they log it. If they don't expect the test team to test it, they don't log it. They understand there actions have consequences, and so they make that decision carefully. We never penalize anyone for ...


5

I think you should ask the developers and business owners rather than us. :-) Ask them how to handle these kind of border cases. Do they want bug reports also on unclear things to remind them or do they want to talk about them first and decide case by case whether to file a bug? Remember it's your task to provide them information on what is or could be ...


4

From your explanation two things I can infer Code review shows parameters not handled / passed No time to test it My Questions I would challenge why you do not have time to test it. You can check for Free tools like SOAP UI which can help to test the methods directly without writing single line of code Secondly reporting an issue without actually ...


4

I have personally found that the more you can reduce the overhead of developers fixing bugs before the code hits the main source branch the better off you are. I generally use a rule that as soon as a bug will be seen by or could effect someone else then it must be logged. This allows testers and developers to pair together as part of a pre-checkin review ...


3

First google Exploratory Testing. Some ideas for testing might be- yours, and your customer's expectations and needs (what is the program used for) similar programs (compare to other knowns) relevant standards, or de-facto and industry standards (from national or international standard bodies e.g. ISO/IEEE/FDA etc. other sources might be known practices) ...


2

How about: "If a job's worth doing it's worth doing well!" Why do we review other peoples work, because they are sloppy? No, I believe in continuously improving in small steps, someone has to monitor what needs improving though :)


1

Classic one might be the Linus's Law: "given enough eyeballs, all bugs are shallow"


1

You could try these if it helps: "Review or Lament" "Review or Perish"


1

In my company some teams report problems found in code review using collaborative code review tools like Crucible. Those allow to share comments about the code inline and integrate easily with IDE. Our architect sometimes send e-mails with code review results and they go through grooming and are included in the backlog of stories to do. I, as a tester, try ...



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