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15

Lessons Learned In Software Testing - Cem Kaner, James Bach, Bret Pettichord. 293 short lessons on various aspects of software testing, you're bound to find something useful in it.


14

testerab, Great question. I'm a huge believer in these kinds of activities. You Would Enjoy Spending Time with Markus Gärtner When I think of the software testing community's response to code katas, I think of the prolific testing blogger Markus Gartner and his involvement in promoting Testing Dojos. They are collaborative, facilitated, group exercises ...


11

If you are the sole tester, and might continue to be for a while, it probably doesn't matter much if you choose whatever tool you personally prefer. But if there is an expectation that other programmers will contribute to test automation, you should take their needs and preferences into consideration as well. Then again, when your company grows enough, you ...


11

I came upon this idea because I find writing a sorting algorithm is much more exciting than testing it.Since testing it is just giving a set of values and verifying the result.Anybody can do that.But,writing algorithms not many can do. No, don't seek a test architect's position. If this is truly how you feel, you should strive to be in ...


10

One of my favourites is Parkcalc ... Parkcalc is a real world application for calculating how much your parking is going to cost at the Gerald R. Ford international airport. It is also full of bugs, yet it works mostly. The requirements come in the form of the parking brochure. So you don't pound the real one into the gound there are a couple of self hosted ...


10

"Perfect Software and other illusions about testing" by Gerald Weinberg should be on your "to read" list. Here's an interesting example that will give you a flavor of the book. In chapter 3 "Why Not Just Test Everything?", Weinberg has a section called "There are an infinite number of possible tests." He talks about a backdoor placed into a highly ...


8

One book that I would recommend is Debugging by Thinking by Robert Charles Metzger This is a very unique book in that it approaches how to do testing the way Sherlock Holmes and other fictional detectives might of done it, looking at logic, psychology, engineering, etc. The book is pretty comprehensive and would be useful for a wide range of engineers both ...


8

These days, I'd say Selenium RC is not worth learning unless you have a specific need for it--for example, to work with legacy test code that uses it. I don't think it will give you a significantly better appreciation of the Selenium architecture. You can get that by exploring the Selenium code base if you have an interest. If you the know WebDriver API ...


6

I've successfully completed the AST's BBST Foundations course, and a couple of colleagues have just completed it (and enjoyed it!). It is possible to self-study with the material, but I'd definitely recommend doing the AST course if you can. (There is a self-study student workbook in preparation, due out late 2012/early 2013). When you do the AST course, ...


6

Craig - please don't feel you're not ready for the Weekend Testing sessions, they're absolutely intended to be a safe space for testers of all levels to try new things and make mistakes in a friendly and supportive environment where they can learn from them. We've had people who've never worked as a tester but who are interested in entering the profession ...


6

Alan (Page) post explaining how Microsoft see the role of a test architect Another post by John Morrison describing how Oracle sees it If you read the posts above I think you know now that there is no one concrete definition for a test architect. I am a test architect at a large global company, and find it challenging and exciting but the contents of my ...


5

Ahmet, I agree your thought of a wiki for testing techniques could be a valuable idea for software testers. The best testing technique repositories that I am aware of are of the "dead tree" variety. Lee Copeland's "A Practitioner's Guide to Software Test Design" is the best book on the topic in my view. Available only in book format. Also well worth ...


5

Quite simply No! WebDriver was a project in its own right before it merged with Selenium so looking at the Selenium RC codebase and API is not going to give you any insight as to why certain decisions were made inside WebDriver. Selenium RC is currently deprecated, so if you do start learning it you are learning something that is no longer supported and ...


4

The career path most definitely exists if you make it for yourself. I know of a few testers who have gone on to purely security. Functional approaches and security approaches can often overlap each other, and many of those who I speak with in the security field are grateful for their previous test experience. After a time however, I've found that often ...


4

I am a big proponent of removing as many abstraction layers between my automated tests and the product code as possible. Ruby or other scripting languages may seem fine for now, but if your test automation expands beyond simulating manipulating GUI elements you may find that C# may have been a better choice to begin with for several reasons: Performance, ...


3

I agree that the language in general wont matter but with this caveat: since the product is coded in .Net you might look at the latest test tools that Microsoft includes with the tester edition of VS. The primary advantage being that tests and test documents could be managed in TFS, over time taking advantage of that could be helpful. Tests and test ...


3

WRT value, a conference is similar to other types of education. You can sit there and expect to be spoon-fed answers, or you can be an active learner and participate in your supplementing your knowledge. People who just 'show-up' to any form of training (including a conference) and expect someone to give them the answers to their woes tend to get very ...


3

You could look up Testing Dojo's as well, and add another URL to the answer list: Testing Challenges. Some Programming Katas might be useful as well, I believe there used to be a few Ruby Kata's that were more geared towards testing but that was a few years ago and I don't know what the state of those are now. Edit 1: Ruby Kata github project. Code ...


3

Anything is good practice for QA. It doesn't even need to be software. I have tried all sorts of QA approaches on the elevators in my office building, as their code is buggy as hell. I'll admit that it's a difficult question for me to answer, though, because I can't really turn my "QA sense" off at all. It's constantly running, looking at how things work ...


3

As testerab said above, the course is quite intensive. I have successfully completed it as well and it requires quite a bit of commitment. You work a great deal with a team/group to generate ideas and form a cohesive set of heuristics for approaching whatever project the instructors throw at you. So you'll have to deal with communication with a ...


3

I came upon this idea because I find writing a sorting algorithm is much more exciting than testing it. Since testing it is just giving a set of values and verifying the result - anybody can do that. But writing algorithms not many can do. That isn't testing. Just taking a set of values and verifying the result? The tester needs to define what values ...


2

If you are a member of AST (the Association for Software Testing) or just want to do the self-study method I'd recommend taking a look at the Black Box Software Testing courses: http://www.testingeducation.org/BBST/ - free online materials http://www.associationforsoftwaretesting.org/training/courses/ - AST's training information There are several ...


2

A number of expert testers like James Bach have put their bookshelves online and I talked about them here: http://sqa.stackexchange.com/a/2685/1455. Basically what I said was software testing expert James Bach has a growing list of books on his Tester's Bookshelf that are worth looking at: http://www.librarything.com/catalog/satisfice/testersbookshelf ...


2

For starters, there's every piece of software in the world if you just want to improve testing skills. For a deeper practice, I recommend things like open source projects, weekend testing, and uTest. Although I've never been able to make the time for weekend testing, I've participated with uTest a few times and always found it not only a great way to ...


2

I went to PNSQC in 2009, and it was a great experience. A few of my colleagues went to the STARWest, and they shared the same experience. What you get Sitting through various lectures and presentation provided a lot of knowledge on what kind of problems are being faced, how the professionals deal with those, and the solutions they have used - whether ...


2

I don’t think that learning C# for testing purposes is way harder than learning Ruby. C# has a lot of syntax sugar that enables you to write less code. With C# you could use WatiN (supports IE and FireFox only: http://sourceforge.net/projects/watin/) or Selenium. It does not depend what language/platform you choose, but if you will have a problems with ...


2

My answer is the old favorite: it depends. If you're looking for blackbox regression, the language doesn't matter, although it does help to have other programmers who understand what you're doing with automated tests that they can either help write it or help debug it. If you're looking to build unit tests, you're better off working with the same language as ...


2

If it is a very small company and you aren't mandated to use a specific tool set, I would choose whatever you prefer and what is easier for you to learn and be interested in. They are asking you to test the software with the best tools available and that's up to you. That being said, if you don't want to be expected to maintain the testing suite forever ...


2

There are a ton of websites and blogs devoted to testing. You could start there. A quick search using Google for something like "software testing" would also be a good way to get started. You might choose to start with The Association for Software Testing: http://www.associationforsoftwaretesting.org/ They have excellent reading and training resources. ...


2

In addition to what the other responses have said: It's a lot easier to get a position in automation or as a lead if you're already doing the work of one whether you have that position formally or not. It looks from what you've said that you have the experience to claim this in terms of what you've done if not in terms of "number of years experience" (my ...



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