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7

One of the realities about corporate politics (I hate to say it, but it's a big part of our job) is that everyone wants to put out the image that they're open minded and willing to do what's best for the company, but in reality most people want to go with what is safest for their career and with what they know and are comfortable with. < tangent > If ...


6

As a general rule of thumb, everytime a test fails or has an indeterminate outcome it requires investigation. If you ignore a failing/indeterminate test then you increase the risk of missing or overlooking a bug. The value of automation is to execute tests that we deem important enough that we want to run them repeatitively, or tests that are executed more ...


6

I don't see why it wouldn't scale. It's conceptually simple (which naturally makes it self open to scalability.) I would be weary though - the more complex a test is, the less effective it is. If you have tests you're worried about being too complex "Given, When, Then" (I almost abbreviated that to GWT but realized that would confuse people haha. Ahem...) ...


5

Although I don't have any experience using SpecFlow, I've recently starting using StoryQ for this type of testing. Although I was very leary on it at first, I've found it to be very useful, including in complex scenario's. Not only is the code more organized now, but also, I've found it easier to write more complex scenario's as it forces me to break it up ...


3

From a pure technical design viewpoint, a single solution would most likely be better. This is a case where the real answer depends on what the impact is if you run your "Test" tests in production. For example, if you are testing Facebook and creating new test account from scratch and then modifying it, then you could probably run all your tests in every ...


3

Whenever possible I try to have the same solution for testing in my test environments as in my production environments. It isn't always possible, but when it is there are many benefits of this approach: You are sure the tests are the same, so all the time you have put into updating, maintaining and improving those tests for your test environment also gets ...


3

You certainly can. Both WebClient, or HttpRequest would work well as the 'glue' for this scenario. Note that I'd probably rephrase your Given/When/Then Statement as something like: Given the logon page at http://someurl/account/logon When I post with parameters username='test' and password='123' Then I am redirected to http://someurl/home


3

Firstly, I think you used the word "anger" when you meant "earnest" - but this is purely a guess on my part. If my guess is correct (a "big" IF), then to answer your question, I would say "yes" - in other words, I would use "given" "when" "then" for more complex scenarios.


2

You can create mock response files of that web service and use them during development of your site. I assume that general structure of web service response is already established.


2

The insertion of Thread.Sleep() is typically indicative of a race condition in your test and your test is running out of sync with the thing is it testing. One suggestion may be to insert a polling loop to wait for the redirect, or an event to indicate the redirect has happened. See http://www.testingmentor.com/imtesty/?p=652 and read the comments for ...


2

If you are using SpecFlow look at the Tags Tags description where placing a specific tag before your Scenario allows you to run the specific ones you want. I use @test or @dev for specific User/Functional Tests and when using my NUnit Driver I put in the tag with the /include option. This links in to the SpecFlow feature files such that the following case ...


2

It appears that NUnit http://www.nunit.org/index.php?p=testFixture&r=2.5 now supports parameterized test fixtures. This may allow you to create a test that will do what you need. This SO answer has a similar question for NUnit selenium tests. ...


2

In my experience, you can't sell new development processes. The only path I've found which works is to simply start doing it: Only develop with TDD from this point forward. You'll still deliver your code on time, but it'll be more maintainable and have far fewer bugs. You'll feel much less anxiety and be proud of your work. After a little time, management ...


1

I found a workaround for this issue where I can check for the exception after each step using the [AfterStep] binding. This works for me, and tests that failed are now marked as inconclusive: [AfterStep] public void check() { var exception = ScenarioContext.Current.TestError; if (exception is WebDriverException ...


1

Specflow and Fitnesse approach the process of testing in two different ways. The process of passing inputs into your tests is very much a way of exploring the functionality of what the system can do. BDD however is all about defining scenarios that define exactly what the system should do. As a result, I would susggest the execution pattern for these ...


1

A lot of your question talks about the tools, Jira, source control, etc. I think you are letting the process that the tools facilitate is guiding your thinking too much. If you read Liz Keogh, she repeatedly talks about the conversation that you need to have in order to fully define and form your ideas about the feature that you are developing. I think ...


1

We also have same issue in our production monitoring automation suite. To solve this problem to some extent, whenever a test is failed it is marked as INTERMITTENT and same test is repeated for max. 3 times or until it is passed. If it is getting passed in any one of next repetition then issue is left as Intermittent and not alerted. If it is failing all the ...


1

The major benefit for me is that Specflow compiles feature file into the unit tests. I am using NUnit and with this feature I can run my tests written in “classic” style and GivenWhenThen style in one suite. Some things look very ridiculous when I’ve tried to describe them in Gherkin (Specflow): Scenario: The edit user page should have button Delete ...


1

You can use Given/When/Then for scenarios with any complicity level, for instance, Very specific scenario: Scenario: Error when the password and confirm password do not match Given I am on User Registration From When I fill the Form fields as follow: | Field | Value | | Name | myusrname| | Password| password123| |Confirm Password | ...


1

"it will extend the time a program spends in development" Initially, this may be true but as the software matures and becomes more complex, the TDD approach will actually reduce the time a program spends in development since the code-base will be more robust, easier to maintain and less prone to bugs. Once you have good unit test code coverage and a full ...



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