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"Testing", "validation", and "verification" are just words that people attach to different kinds of practices. Some of those practices focus more on "Did I build it right"; others focus more on "Did I build the right thing." You can name and group those practices in different ways depending on what you are trying to accomplish. If you want to be clear ...


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At risk of rehashing previous threads, verification (according to ISO12207) is ensuring the correct processes and standards are followed and that all requirements are traceable though the lifecycle, not the testing of actual requirements. Testing is a validation activity - you are validating the code against the requirement. At the end of the day, your ...


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The first document appears to be the last draft version of the published (expensive) version - in fact, this page states that and appears (to my reading) to be recommending that you use the draft: http://www.testingstandards.co.uk/bs_7925-2.htm What reasons do you have for using either standard at all? Neither will help you to fulfil your stakeholders' ...


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If you're looking for a framework to give you some structure, ITIL would be a good place to start. It's flexible in that you're empowered to adapt ITIL to your own situation and needs. There are many level's of ITIL implementation, but check over this link on the fundamentals and see if it's what you're looking for: ITIL Foundation


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The short answer You've been tricked into asking the wrong question by a process that is not designed to actually provide you any guidance your day-to-day tasks. See the pithy Q&A on the Programmers site for a pragmatic take on this: http://programmers.stackexchange.com/questions/175393/iso-12207-verification-of-integration-and-unit-test-validation ...


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ISO 15288 covers the System lifecycle, while ISO 12207 covers the Software lifecycle. As of 2008, the two are "harmonized for concurrent use". For instance, 12207 can be used "either alone or in conjunction with ... 15288" In a bit more detail, what this means is that 15288 covers all aspects of developing a system, where examples of system components are ...


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A national standards body sent me a list of standards.. buried in there are references to: ISO/IEC 90003 "Software engineering - Guidelines for the application of ISO 9001:2000 to computer software" and ISO/IEC TR 90005 "Systems engineering - Guidelines for the application of ISO 9001 to system life cycle processes" which, at the very least, implies that ...


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My thoughts are that this is more about the differences between static and dynamic than analysis and testing. My own personal definitions are: Static testing = Testing of requirements, designs, specifications, log files, configuration files etc. Dynamic testing = Testing of the application whilst it is running. Likewise, Static analysis = Analysis of ...


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Simple difference in both Validation and Verification is: Validation is to check "did we build the right thing" or to check the expected results. Validation goes throughout the product lifecycle at different statges; from requirement to design to CAT(customer acceptance testing) Verification is Validation of Validation. To find out whether something going ...


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Did I build it right (verification) and did we build the right thing (validation) is the best way to explain the difference to our new (and mature) engineers. Remember that validation happens over the entire lifecycle. Acceptance Testing (verification) also contributes to the validation of the product. Once a product is accepted or bought off as meeting the ...


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As user246 said, tell how you are going to use the terms and then use them that way. You have noticed that they are not well defined and even in standards there are contradictory definitions. Just tell which of those you are using. You said: When asking the famous questions, "Do I build it right" and "Did I build the right thing", it is not helpful ...



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