Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

4

Static testing is reviewing the program code without executing it. Its focus is mostly on the following: Code maintainability, ie making code more readable by humans; Finding out typos and other silly mistakes in code (like typos in variable names, off-by-one errors, etc); Reviewing algorithms used by programmer. While static testing only is ...


3

It's part of a tester's job to ask questions about the product that nobody else has even thought of yet. Waiting until after significant programming time has been spent to even start asking those questions - well, does that sound sensible to you? Some of my best defects (except we called them review comments) have been raised before a single line of code ...


3

Static testing from the developers viewpoint is testing that is done on code without running the application or the code itself. Common ways to perform static testing on code is to run code analysis tools (Wikipedia list of commercial products) or security analysis tools. In the wider testing context, static testing is any form of testing where the ...


3

Take this requirement example for a calculator program - Calculator should accurately do division of two numbers. After static analysis (testing) you might say - requirements are incomplete as it does not clearly states that up to what decimal points calculation is to be done. How round off is to take place. What should happen in case of division by 0 ...


2

In my shop Testers (and Developers as well) formally review Requirements. We read the documents ahead of time, then get together with the entire project team and go through them. We find that Testers with their domain knowledge and differing viewpoint can provide insight in several areas checking the Requirements for testability checking for clarity, ...


2

I performed some BA in addition to QA w/my previous employer & there is no doubt in my mind I tested much more thoroughly as a result. One thing I did not expect was this: the developers were plumb crazy about the requirements documents that I wrote because I integrated the technical details with the customer's "wants" in a way they could relate to. ...


1

Most of this comes from Wikipedia and these lecture notes. Wikipedia defines a fixed point this way: In mathematics, a fixed point [...] of a function is an element of the function's domain that is mapped to itself by the function. [...] That is to say, c is a fixed point of the function f(x) if and only if f(c) = c. For example, for the function f(x) ...


1

I've always found immense benefit to requirements being tested before being handed to the developer. In many cases, I prefer the developer to be testing with me. Not only do we get to learn about the application before we develop it, but, we usually end up cutting down time lost by sending back requirements after it's already been partially developed. ...


1

You might like to read the book Effective Methods for Software Testing. It has some checklists for checking things like requirements. While the book is big enough to be a door stop, it also has lots of checklists for every stage of testing and QA.



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible