Hot answers tagged

48

As a developer with 15+ years experience, I'd say: please report the bug. I'd much rather have a ticket in the tracking system than a vague memory of a hallway conversation, or an interruption of what I'm working on. As Joel Spolsky put it: At any given time, I can only remember two bugs. If you ask me to remember three, one of them will fall on the ...


30

Short answer is "everyone" - as was pointed out in other responses. For the long answer, I'll refer to an article I wrote recently on this exact subject, The One That Got Away.


21

I'm not sure what you mean by "responsible" in this context? who should get yelled at who should be fired who should get demerits on their next annual review who should take action to cure the problem something else Clearly both the developer(s) and tester(s), and almost certainly others, should be concerned whenever a defect escapes into production. ...


20

it makes the higher ups really happy to see results, and the winning QA members get lunch. Since you have set the system up so that there are "winners" and "losers" based on bug count, it's not much of a surprise that testers are trying to find a way to win. You are focusing on the wrong goal. You have basically told them that the goal is not improved ...


15

The whole team regardless of responsibilities should shoulder the blame. It is not a "test escape" but a "team escape". Testing is not only a department, it is also a discipline that everyone in the team should be involved in.


14

In my own experience, I've found that this really depends on the culture of the team or company that you're working with. On a team with good communication skills, and where everyone works together well, you may very well be able to just tell the developer about it, they take a look at it, and say it'll be fixed in 5 minutes. If it's longer, maybe ...


11

There are several things that you need to remember before starting this task: You do not want to measure just for the sake of measurement; instead, you want to achieve a clearer view of what you have (or do) and how can you make it happen better. You do not want to for your team nor their performance to be only driven by improving the measured results, for ...


11

Bug hunts should be fun and productive for the entire team, and a little professional competition can go a long way to improve moral of the entire team and help them grow. This is a rare case that I slightly disagree with Joe. I also like the idea of a point system. But would expand to include: Everyone is involved in the bug hunt; not just testers. ...


11

We prefer to talk to developers first. Then, we together decide if detected error is a result of some quirk in processing and not even worth of bug, or, if it is worth a bug, we negotiate who will enter it to Bugzilla (we call if "buggify the feedback"). Often, developers prefer to write the bug description, because that way they can better describe the ...


11

Do not discuss defects immediately with developers. Mainly because context switching is bad for their focus and could take up to 5-30 minutes to recover from. How to communicate a defect depends in which stage of development the defect is found. When I find a defects during testing of a task of the current iteration then I document the defect in the ...


11

I think, it is always good to discuss things in person. You are lucky you have that things going on at your work place. In many companies all communication happens only via a system and that at times creates lot of confusion. What you write and what the other person understands may be completely different. For things like developers don't consider the bugs, ...


10

What value is "yesterday, today, blocking" to this team of testers? Presumably they have similar scrums where they present the same information to the functional team they are assigned to. So you may be asking them to repeat what they have just said, or will soon say. Perhaps you instead want to focus your meeting on "what is important for other testers ...


9

Eduard, welcome to SQA. I will assume you are that developer. I think there are a lot of ways a developer can help a QA team. The most obvious way to help would be to write automated tests or to write tools that make testing easier, e.g. creating test data or automating a deployment. You may have skills outside of coding that would also benefit your ...


9

My perspective is - This question is more related to identifying charter / vision for the team based on current state of the Team You have to assess your current test process, tools, bugs, automation, product quality to arrive at areas of improvements Your proposal for roadmap would cover below aspects Roadmap for Team Team should have a roadmap to ...


8

First off, everything I say here should be checked against your job description - that's going to tell you what your employer expects of you. As a lead, you probably don't have hire/fire responsibility (that usually goes with the manager title), so your employer's expectations will probably fall into these areas: resource management - making sure that ...


8

As Bookeater says, you absolutely want to unify tools and processes between the teams. That said, I'm going to offer some extra advice because I've been in this situation (and to some extent I am still in this situation). Hasten slowly - Each team has built up a process and toolset that works for them. A newcomer telling them they have to change everything ...


7

As said, everyone. This is why postmortems are important and valuable, as well as high-communication environments where people feel comfortable taking responsibility for problems without being afraid of blame. Get everyone who might have had a chance to eliminate this issue - management, PMs, developers, testers, business owners, and so forth into a room. ...


7

I think your question assumes the positions are mutually exclusive, but I've worked places where we had a per-project lead and a cross-project manager. I think the tradeoffs are the same as between a dev manager and a dev lead. You need leaders in a team for mentoring, more difficult work, and technical direction. Somewhere in the organization you need a ...


7

I think your suggestions are very good, it is always good to have clear guidelines. Though they should not be set in stone and should be used as a guideline and not as a rule. Full-screen In order to reproduce the issue I want as much information as possible. A screenshot can tell a thousand words. Some people make only a screenshot of the part they think ...


7

Apart from obvious activities like test data creation, test case execution, bug reports...what other initiatives can a QA engineer , take which will help raise his value to the project/Client. You can only do what the situation and context permit you to do. In some shops testers get to review the Requirements before they are finalized. If that's ...


7

I imagine this would depend on the bug being raised. If it's a glaringly obvious bug (pages not loading, basic function not working, etc.) then I wouldn't waste a developer's time confirming it and do a write-up. However if I come across something that may be considered an edge case or I'm unsure of the intended functionality (mostly found during negative ...


7

Should Testers first discuss the bug with the developers before reporting it? From my experience in several different organizations I think the answer given the current question details is "it depends" It will depend on general factors such as: size of company size of development group current deadlines location of developers industry development ...


6

Before you attempt to implement a metrics program, I strongly urge you to read "Measuring and Managing Performance in Organizations" by Robert D. Austin. You owe it to your team and to yourself to learn about the people-related aspects of measurement systems, and how "measurement dysfunction" occurs. And you may learn about the appropriate level of ...


6

My personal preference is to share resources across features and even products. While working on a single feature or product does increase specializing, that in itself has some associated cons: If the person specializing in a feature has missed something important and everyone else is not familiar enough with what they are doing to notice it, that could ...


6

A developer can be also useful to QA team in defect isolation. Having skills to read the code, understand the architecture of the system and debug a running program, you will be able to isolate the root cause of the defect you or the rest of your QA team has found. It is often faster to reproduce and isolate the issue, when you are performing the tests and ...


6

I seldom worry about individual titles and even less about department names. My team is called Quality Assurance. Nobody in my company actually thinks we assure quality.


6

The testing team I'm on finally got everyone to start calling us "testers" and "testing" instead of "QA". We're organizationally a separate team from development, but de facto we work as a whole team together. Testers often pair with programmers, and programmers often do testing. It's true that as testers we do a huge variety of activities, and some people ...


6

By the success of the company. Buy-in for QA will need to come from the top rather then the justification being looked for in data. You will, over time, be able to point to things like some major bugs prevented from reaching customers performance issues anticipated and planned for unusual bugs discovered for certain conditions more new customers more ...


6

As a corollary to what David said, testers have the same memory limitations that developers do. If you don't log the bug, chances are very good it won't get fixed. This is especially true if it's not a severe bug, as chances are very good that the developer(s) are working on fixing severe problems first, and won't fix less severe ones for a while. And by ...


5

I'm quite happy to be called a tester and though a lone gun would also be happy to be a test team If other people think 'testing' is demeaning or lowly then educate them into exactly what you do And depends on your definition of 'testing' - see this post from Alan Page for example - http://angryweasel.com/blog/?p=298



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