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0

Yes, A developer would be able to advise how to do further testing. The important thing is that it is before you write the report. Not instead. The developer is not responsible for deciding if a bug has been removed.


1

To stay simple, and echo what others have said- (20 years experience here)... Find the steps to reproduce Take your screen shots or grab logs, etc. Find the root cause if you can Report the bug. Get it in the system. Perhaps do some limited searching to make sure it isn't a duplicate. speak to the developer at this point or when first able <-fin-> :)


1

The PM, the designer, the QA, the developer and other stakeholders; each of them have different perspectives and expectations from the product, even when working with a perfect analysis. An objective look really matters. So, sometimes, especially when I am about to release a new feature or unsure of the requirements of my task, I ask for QA's time and ask ...


0

Just repeating some of what has already been said, but as another voice with 15+ years of combined QA & Dev experience, I would agree mostly with those who say that it all depends on what works best for your company/teams. However that said, I'm a fan of open dialog between Dev & QA, and I personally think teams that have that in place will fare ...


0

I think you should absolutely discuss it with the developer. I work in an environment where we have a mainframe connected via MQ and other middleware to various front ends (web apps, POS machines, smartphone apps). Just because a scenario fails doesn't mean the code is bad. Maybe the middleware developer isn't passing the correct data to the front end. Maybe ...


2

Report the bug. A QA person's role is to be an independent verification authority. Someone who understands the products requirements and who is focused on quality. Make sure you document your problem scenario/reproduction steps so that your bug report stands up to scrutiny. The problem with discussing bugs ahead of logging them is that it introduces ...


5

I think, it is always good to discuss things in person. You are lucky you have that things going on at your work place. In many companies all communication happens only via a system and that at times creates lot of confusion. What you write and what the other person understands may be completely different. For things like developers don't consider the bugs, ...


2

Since I work at a team that doesn't have specific requirements for projects, I always communicate it with the developers and showing them how I reproduced the issue. They will acknowledge it. Sometimes they would say, let me check on that.. Coming back, they would say, oh I have fixed that please test it. Before they can fix it, I have already documented the ...


3

If my dev counterpart is available I try to talk with them first. That gives them the chance to request extra information that I might not have thought of. If my dev counterpart tells me that that area is not ready for testing, I tell them I will enter a bug just to remind myself to come back and look at the area once they believe it is ready. If I hear ...


4

It depends. Some of the factors I've found impact whether or not I report something formally or not: Development Methodology - If I'm working in an agile environment I'm more likely to work informally with the developer at first. In a waterfall environment, I'm more likely to report the issue because the developer has probably moved on to something else, ...


4

My view as a developer is that even if you are unsure it is a bug then report it. The upshot of this is (some of this has been mentioned by others) If you are unsure if it is a bug then you do not have enough product knowledge to perform the testing. This could be for several reasons, including partial training, poor documentation and insufficiently ...


4

If it is a clear and obvious breach against uncomplicated acceptance criteria, then report bug as soon as possible. Feel free to bypass the developer, BA or product owner. Otherwise, do not report the bug unless you first talk to the author of acceptance criteria (eg: BA or product owner), and the developer. If you do not: it is possible that you will ...


6

As a corollary to what David said, testers have the same memory limitations that developers do. If you don't log the bug, chances are very good it won't get fixed. This is especially true if it's not a severe bug, as chances are very good that the developer(s) are working on fixing severe problems first, and won't fix less severe ones for a while. And by ...


11

Do not discuss defects immediately with developers. Mainly because context switching is bad for their focus and could take up to 5-30 minutes to recover from. How to communicate a defect depends in which stage of development the defect is found. When I find a defects during testing of a task of the current iteration then I document the defect in the ...


5

It depends... What is the overhead associated with reporting a problem? Some organization have big enterprisy processes, that requires lots of clicking, mandatory fields and multiple actors between the time a problem is open and the time everyone is done with it. You might also loose sight of important problems if they're drowning in a sea of minor (or ...


7

Should Testers first discuss the bug with the developers before reporting it? From my experience in several different organizations I think the answer given the current question details is "it depends" It will depend on general factors such as: size of company size of development group current deadlines location of developers industry development ...


4

Definitely make a ticket. If the bug is "don't fix", you can refer another tester or developer who finds the same bug to the existing one, and save the developer some time. If the bug is a quick 5 minute fix, it still takes 5 minutes to do, and you have to remember to properly re-test. If these little distractions add up and are not documented, things ...


45

As a developer with 15+ years experience, I'd say: please report the bug. I'd much rather have a ticket in the tracking system than a vague memory of a hallway conversation, or an interruption of what I'm working on. As Joel Spolsky put it: At any given time, I can only remember two bugs. If you ask me to remember three, one of them will fall on the ...


4

If the tester thinks that it is a defect, most likely it is a defect. The developer may be correct that the process is working as intended, in that case the defect is possibly in the documentation, user interface or testing plan. It should be logged, even if is testing error. This will lead to better determining where documentation deficiencies exist.


4

If there is possibility to discuss the bug, it could be valuable, for example you will have direct information of the cause and who will be the assignee of the bug. But generally it is not mandatory. It could be done as well after the bug is reported. Does not matter if you discuss the bug with developer or not, probably you will have to report the bug ...


7

I imagine this would depend on the bug being raised. If it's a glaringly obvious bug (pages not loading, basic function not working, etc.) then I wouldn't waste a developer's time confirming it and do a write-up. However if I come across something that may be considered an edge case or I'm unsure of the intended functionality (mostly found during negative ...


11

We prefer to talk to developers first. Then, we together decide if detected error is a result of some quirk in processing and not even worth of bug, or, if it is worth a bug, we negotiate who will enter it to Bugzilla (we call if "buggify the feedback"). Often, developers prefer to write the bug description, because that way they can better describe the ...


14

In my own experience, I've found that this really depends on the culture of the team or company that you're working with. On a team with good communication skills, and where everyone works together well, you may very well be able to just tell the developer about it, they take a look at it, and say it'll be fixed in 5 minutes. If it's longer, maybe ...


1

Do you guys have a specific person that does Automation? If not, I would highly suggest you begin looking into Selenium since you guys are webapp-based, depending on your comfort level with coding you could start with just using the Selenium IDE and using the record function and move up to Selenium Webdriver from there.


2

Suggestions: Work on your writing and communication. You've asked two questions in your post, but haven't used question marks. Ellipses have three periods. Learn the difference between its and it's. Use an active voice in your writing. Speak to people more than you email or message. Conversely, don't socialize too much or waste other people's time. Find ...


1

qa_test235, I noticed that your are an unregistered user of this forum and I am not sure how this affects your ability to participate. Become a registered member of Stack Exchange and participate as you can in helping others learn about SW testing and quality engineering. This activity may seem unnecessary or maybe a burden. Over time this will add some ...


1

Test automation and push toward continuous delivery is slowly but surely reducing the need for manual testing. Learn BDD and other means of how to ensure developers' are writing good automated test and satisfying business needs. To go even further, learn how to write test code yourself; QA experience and knowing how to code will make you stand out from those ...


2

Are you recommending the best/most appropriate way to test a problem? Are you thinking of scenarios or perspectives others arn't? Are you making sure you are seen as a valued asset within the team and not just a rubber stamp? What I must stress though, is that there is no "quick fix". The main thing is to build up trust and respect within the team. ...


1

I've never used metrics in this way, however, you can build a case with some care and a lot of data mining. First find out the average time cost per bug found by customers. You're going to need to find out how much time is spent in diagnosis, fixing, devising workarounds, and pushing patches, and average over the total number of bugs (this will never be ...


7

Apart from obvious activities like test data creation, test case execution, bug reports...what other initiatives can a QA engineer , take which will help raise his value to the project/Client. You can only do what the situation and context permit you to do. In some shops testers get to review the Requirements before they are finalized. If that's ...


0

Do you have the opportunity to compare two projects delivered one with and one without the QA effort? If projects are comparable you should realize that bugs reported by customers are less both as amount and severity. If not, your QA team could not be set up as it should. Non conformities or variances reported by customers are a huge price to pay not only in ...


0

This is sort of a slippery slope sort of thing to get in, because if you measure by amount of bugs...that's not always accurate. But in some cases it is difficult for managers/etc... to really see the value of QA. Especially in cases where people expect a completely bug free system or otherwise "QA is failing to do their job". The easiest thing to remember ...


1

Metrics are misleading. You can catch 10 000 useless bugs, but if the one that kills a few patients in the hospital is not caught, you're dead. Well, dead in terms of career, not as much as the hospital's patients. But metrics can be useful to convince people who believe only in them, unfortunately. If, and only if, the rationale behind the metrics is to ...


4

By the success of the company. Buy-in for QA will need to come from the top rather then the justification being looked for in data. You will, over time, be able to point to things like some major bugs prevented from reaching customers performance issues anticipated and planned for unusual bugs discovered for certain conditions more new customers more ...



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