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8

The traditional definitions would be something like this: A test suite is a collection of test cases related to the same test work. You might have a suite for regression, one for build verification tests, a suite that is specific for a component, and so on. A test plan is generally a document which describes testing approach and methodologies being used for ...


6

Robust is the opposite of fragile; it is the ability to function correctly under a variety of conditions -- perhaps even under conditions that change or that you did not anticipate. Robustness testing is the practice of measuring robustness. Fault injection and mutation testing are ways to measure the robustness of your tests. They don't tell you anything ...


5

You have some choices here. You can go with formal definitions like the ISTQB definition, or you can treat the definitions the way your organization handles them. Software testing is a field where definitions tend to vary depending on the understanding of the team and how they work. That said, in my experience interface testing can be one of two things: ...


2

I take a look into the ISTQB glossary and found this two definitions: interface testing: An integration test type that is concerned with testing the interfaces between components or systems. integration testing: Testing performed to expose defects in the interfaces and in the interactions between integrated components or systems. See also ...


2

I don't know if there's a standard. We call this "Release Testing". http://www.allthingsquality.com/2010/04/qa-q-and-release-tests.html


2

If we refer to ISTQB glossary of terms then test suite: A set of several test cases for a component or system under test, where the post condition of one test is often used as the precondition for the next one. test plan: A document describing the scope, approach, resources and schedule of intended test activities. It identifies amongst others test items, ...


1

I personally agree with Kate that definition is good enough if it is agreed with all participants of the development process and everybody understand it the same way. If you need definition of term I'd suggest next: failover testing: Testing by simulating failure modes or actually causing failures in a controlled environment. Following a failure, the ...


1

Pesticide paradox can be also explained as: If the same tests are repeated over and over again, eventually the same set of test cases will no longer find any new bugs. To overcome this 'pesticide paradox', the test cases need to be regularly reviewed and revised, and new and different tests need to be written to exercise different parts of the software or ...


1

I have always called this Acceptance Testing, it doesn't matter who the Customer is running it (at least in my world, yours will differ) so long as it has a set of Agreed upon tests to run that can be said to "Accept the release to production". Standards in Software depends on what general set of standards you follow, but mostly it's a "depends" answer, ...


1

Latent bugs are bugs which exist, but have not yet been discovered. They are bugs waiting to be found. also see: http://www.allthingsquality.com/p/testing-terms-glossary.html


1

I see this in Ian Somerville's book (9th edition, section 8.3): There are two important distinctions between release testing and system testing during the development process: A separate team that has not been involved in the system development should be responsible for release testing. System testing by the development team should focus on ...



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