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Having used many different issue tracking tools, it is common for all these terms 'defect', 'bug', 'issue' etc... to simply be considered as the same thing and you will find that by default they all simply define one of them. So based on this I would suggest the majority of people would consider them the same thing too.


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For the person who says there is no difference, I'd ask them this question: "Say a particular piece of code causes a product to misbehave. There's certainly a bug in that piece of code. The code is not essential, so it's just commented out. Has the bug in the application been found and fixed? Is there still a defect in the application?" I think most people ...


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The word bug comes from the very first computer bug: Real bugs don't break computers anymore and overtime this analogy starts makes less and less sense. Therefor I have a mission to get rid of the term bug and always use defect for any software related issue and so should you :) Quality is a persons perspective, everyone has a different opinion. I think ...


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I disagree with the answers that suggest a bug and defect are the same thing. In software testing, a bug is an erroneous behaviour that results from a code defect. A code defect is a flaw in the code that causes it not to correctly meet its corresponding specification. In comparison, a defect (used without qualification) is a deviation from ...


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Any distinction made between them will be specific to your company, maybe even to your group in your department, in your company. There are some people who claim there is a clear difference, e.g. this one: A bug is the result of a coding error A defect is a deviation from the requirements or that one: A bug is getting a problem at the ...


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In development testing perhaps no real difference if you stick to comparing the system to the spec. However many things are noticed and logged as defects that are not actually variances from the developer's intentions. The term bug has been used for a long time. It really means whatever you notice about what you have built that isn't "right" yet. Edison ...


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Bug, Defect, Issue, Fault, Incident, Ticket are all the same and are interchangeably used in organisations. People can debate and say they agree or disagree and quote references but the ground reality is, it does not matter what you call it as long as it is tracked, referenced as needed and ultimately fixed. My experience shows below: In Bugzila you will ...


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Same thing. No doubt there are companies that use those terms to mean different things, but their usage is not universal. If someone asks you that question in an interview, you should be able to say, "Where I work, the terms are interchangeable. Do they mean something different here?"


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My understanding of the common use of functional show stopper is that is about an issue that affects a key piece of end user functionality and is visible to end users. For that reason alone it is a show-stopper on the release. This is as opposed to other issues such as test failures, log storage issues, minor ui layout issues, background image issues, ...


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Alpha: Internal user base, development still in progress, all features fully not ready. Testing continues in parallel. Beta: External user base, all features ready but extended to friendly customers to expose it to more people for identification of more defects outside testing environment as majority of the cases Beta is conducted on Production environment....


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I heard about this term 4 years back from now in one of the Trials defects triage call. Show Stopper/Functional Show Stopper is used to categorise defects which makes the entire system unusable i.e. there is no workaround and must be fixed before Live deployment. E.g. Defect Summary: Set top box does not respond at all and a black screen is displayed post ...



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