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15

There are a few things I try to remember about finding bugs in production: Quality isn't binary. If you measure your performance by whether there are bugs, you will always fail. Instead, I consider whether the quality is improving. Failure is a learning opportunity. When a bug makes it into production, I ask myself what I could have done differently. ...


14

> The integration tests can sometimes take a long time, > thus discouraging users from running the entire test > suite prior to checking in For the checkin-runs you can mark the long-running tests with their own category and tell the test-runner to exclude those long-runners You may also look at Is there a way to separate long running (e.g. ...


12

Dedicated Testers I think that it is important to highlight that the role of being a tester, is different to the job of being a tester. There are many situations where you need testing, but you simply can't afford or are unable to have dedicated testers, i.e people who have that job 100% of the time. You simply don't have enough testing, or resources to ...


12

1) Are there a difference between those ones? The Australian IT industry still views testing as a job that anyone can perform with minimal technical skills. A quick search on a leading recruitment site has a number of advertisements for Testers with requirements similar to the following: At least 3 years experience in a Tester or Test Analyst role ...


11

Welcome to SQA, Rosa. I am not sure your question makes sense; QA is an abbreviation for "Quality Assurance", and often is used as a synonym for testing. ISTQB is a type of certification for testers. See also Do ISTQB/ISEB Testing Certificates prove someone can test? and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Caps_lock.


10

Solution Overview To solve this problem, you will want to intelligently select a manageable set of combinations based on a pairwise coverage approach (explained below) or a more thorough variation of combinatorial test design. Glowcoder and user246 have good points. I particularly like testerab's comment for reasons that will become clear in a minute. ...


10

I always want an independent, dedicated, competent tester to test my code. However, I also always want a personal chef to cook for me. I usually can't afford that, either. Most developers have not worked with a truly competent tester, and so they don't know what that is like. For me, the few times I've had that, it was great. Having an ...


9

There's an excellent series of articles about test estimation that everybody involved in producing or using test estimates should read: Project Estimation and Black Swans (Part 1) Project Estimation and Black Swans (Part 2) Project Estimation and Black Swans (Part 3) Project Estimation and Black Swans (Part 4) Project Estimation and Black Swans (Part ...


9

The problem here isn't white-box testing. The problem is that there is no specification. This is where domain knowledge and product familiarity really matters. A tester who just tests that the code does what it was intended to do (from the dev's point of view) by reading the API could very well miss a variety of issues, such as a business requirement that ...


9

You're asking a unicorn question. Why? Because you've skipped over the point of all that work. It doesn't matter what proportion of different types of testing you do, it doesn't matter what your organisation is, and it doesn't matter what technologies you use, if you don't know what information your stakeholders want to discover from your testing. That's ...


9

Automation is using software to test software. Testers use automation for the same kinds of reasons that other professions use automation: to do things in a more reliable, repeatable way than we could do with people. There are other reasons why you might use automation. For example, it may save time and/or save money, although if it is done in the wrong ...


9

What value is "yesterday, today, blocking" to this team of testers? Presumably they have similar scrums where they present the same information to the functional team they are assigned to. So you may be asking them to repeat what they have just said, or will soon say. Perhaps you instead want to focus your meeting on "what is important for other testers ...


9

I agree with Bruce in general; however, 1) Are there differences between a STAE/STE and SDET role? Maybe...it depends on the company. Some companies to not differentiate roles based on title. For example, at Microsoft we used to have both STE and SDET roles and titles. When I started in '94 only people whose primary job was to build and maintain test ...


9

As user246 says, tricks to force developers to test can always be gamed: you're much better off finding out why they don't like testing and what the actual problem is then building a culture of testing and quality from that. You're working in PHP - there are unit test frameworks available for PHP that your devs can use. If they have no idea how much trouble ...


9

This is - sadly - rather more common than anyone here would like. It's where I was when I started at my current position: two major applications, both stable, but the company has never had dedicated test specialists before. The first thing I did was make sure that everyone knew there weren't going to be any quick changes. No matter how skilled a person is, ...


8

My perspective is - This question is more related to identifying charter / vision for the team based on current state of the Team You have to assess your current test process, tools, bugs, automation, product quality to arrive at areas of improvements Your proposal for roadmap would cover below aspects Roadmap for Team Team should have a roadmap to ...


8

Perhaps you misunderstood. Test code/comments should not be included in product source code. But, at some company's test code is managed the same way as product code via source control, and is checked into the same build branches.


8

The traditional definitions would be something like this: A test suite is a collection of test cases related to the same test work. You might have a suite for regression, one for build verification tests, a suite that is specific for a component, and so on. A test plan is generally a document which describes testing approach and methodologies being used for ...


8

I second (third?) the congratulations! While I'm nowhere near as experienced as Joe or Bruce, I can offer a few tips from experience: Communication is critical - you absolutely must have at least an instant messaging application to talk real-time with your team. That application should also be something your development team is using since you want your ...


8

It depends, and there are no industry standards. Seriously. Any metric can be gamed (and will be, if you use it for assessment). I'm not aware of any standard approaches, not least because the teams are - or should be - evaluating themselves regularly and looking for ways to improve their own processes (if they aren't then they're probably using ...


7

If you're using C# you can include test case titles, descriptions, etc. in XML in the automated test case itself, then compile with /doc. The compiler will search for all XML tags in the source code and create an XML file. Another approach is to use meta-tags in your automated tests and use those to produce a list of automated tests. There are several ways ...


7

The primary challenge that I've found when it comes to integrating automated tests with manual tests is the general lack of experience of folks writing GOOD automated tests. As noted in another post, there are serious problems with organizations buying into "record and playback" test automation. If an organization starts on this route and doesn't have ...


7

I think you answer this by asking, "Why do I need a build acceptance test suite?" There is no universal answer, but if your organization has a suite, someone should be able to answer the question. For example, in a previous job, the developers on my team frequently made changes that rendered the build unusable: it would not install, or it would crash as ...


7

I'm going with my favorite response here: it depends. Sometimes the decision is made because that's the language the tool supports. Sometimes the language is a flavor of the language used by the development team - this often happens where there's an expectation that the development team will be writing at least some of the test automation code. Sometimes ...


7

So if I understand your question correctly, you are reporting a test as passed even if it fails later, because you are going to do another test phase. I think that I need to share some tough love. This method is wrong, and could be downright dangerous to someone's career. The reason why is that you simply don't know what state any particular build is in. ...


7

You should not edit the tests to pass. There are still defects in the product, and running the tests and having them fail on those points continues to provide data that the issues are not fixed. Since the development team has accepted the bugs and scheduled (although not solidly) them to be addressed, modifying the tests to no longer report the defects ...


7

First off, everything I say here should be checked against your job description - that's going to tell you what your employer expects of you. As a lead, you probably don't have hire/fire responsibility (that usually goes with the manager title), so your employer's expectations will probably fall into these areas: resource management - making sure that ...


6

The features of many software projects are based on customer stories. Stories describe a typical or target customer and describe how that person uses various features of the software to help them perform some desired task. It is also common for these user stories to have a persona (e.g. Jeremy is at a sporting event and uses his phone to take a picture, ...


6

Read MindMapping 101 from Darren McMillan - http://www.bettertesting.co.uk/content/?p=956 and this discussion ( prompted by myself ) on the STC - http://www.softwaretestingclub.com/forum/topics/im-the-map-im-the-map-im-the They are nothing new, use of them seems to come in waves - as your question demonstrates :)


6

Tracebility matrix is a tool. It doesn't have any inheritent value, but it might be easiest way of mapping certain kind of relations between tests and requirements. As with any other tool, if it seems to work well, use it. If something else fits better, use that. If the tool nearly fits your need, modify it to give what information you need. If testing is ...



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