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To know how to write a test plan one must first learn to plan a test. Planning test is a real thinker task. You should be asking a hell lot of question to learn about the domain of the project. You should learn about the stakeholders of the project. One part of planning consists of test estimation. Here is something that might get you started with it - ...


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I am a BIG fan of feature toggles. It doesn't take too much work to mitigate the risks, and the benefits are well worth it. So my question is toggling unused feature enough to release untested code? No. Feature toggles are not enough to mitigate the risks posed by releasing completely untested code. However, when you test around that code, feature ...


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Let me give some advice I got from James Bach. He likes to make the distinction between a test plan and the test plan document. A test plan document is the written form of the test plan. This can vary quite a bit depending on the company you work for and in my experience can range from lean or minimal to bloated (I’ve seen so many bloated test plan ...


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I agree with milinpatel17' above answer about Test Plan. Test Plan is a detailed layout and strategy to test a product or application. Before you start writing a test plan, consider these points first: Why to test -- objective What to test -- scope How to achieve objective -- required time and money (with number of resources) What approach -- Automation, ...


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Smoke testing is the term teams I've been on used to describe the initial quick pass on brand new code (or at least a new build) to make sure nothing major is broken in a major way (that will block you from the majority of testing). This is the first step before you get into regression and rigorous new feature testing. You may consider Sanity Testing. ...


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The short answer is that you can never be 100% sure. The longer answer is that this is also true for every other part of the product- you test it but can never test it for every possible scenario. The even longer answer is risk management and mitigation- your developers and architects need to asses the risk in solutions A and B (feature flags vs. ...


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This is usually referred as A/B testing. I have personally tested this. With Feature Enabled - Testing performed for new feature and regression to ensure nothing is broken With Feature Disabled - Regression performed to ensure functionality remains intact. Automation / Required Manual tests will be run in case if this code is going to remain in production ...


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Very interesting question. As per my experience as QA , I would like to suggest following : 1 - If you are releasing BETA version then you can stay with new feature and release it with new feature. So you can get more review about from users. 2 - If you are releasing main version then you should not release features which are untested means not tested by ...


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The usual definition of a test plan is detailed here. The image you've posted, however, is exactly how Microsoft Test Manager is organized. You create a "test plan" (in their terminology this means the tests to be executed) for a certain release or sprint. In a test plan, you may have one or more test suites, which contain test cases. (Normally grouped in a ...



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