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7

It's really no different than any other test case. Set up conditions: Check actual result against the expected result So you'll need a list of all the error messages in the system and the conditions that make these errors appear If you want to really test them out then use the FAILURE mnemonic as detailed here.


6

If the system needs to scale to many concurrent users or work with lots of data, I would say load testing should be started as early as possible. This way possible problems in the application architecture can be found in a phase where it is still possible to fix them. Couple examples: Let's say that the database schema is such that some queries will be ...


6

As well as "what Joe said, in bulldozer-sized loads", I have a few pointers to add from experience with localization/translation. To test internationalization - which will need to happen first - you'll want something that's really obvious so that in a test environment your team can go through every interaction in the system to check that everything that ...


4

As always, it depends. If the system is already sufficiently internationalized, and other localizations have already been performed, then future localizations may be well-defined, documented efforts and their scope may be easily estimated based on past efforts. On the other hand, if the system isn't internationalized at all, then you may need to incur the ...


4

A few thoughts to add to the excellent suggestions others have made: Yes, full end-to-end load tests should ideally happen after code is stable. These will be used to find bottlenecks in the interfaces between different components of your code. This kind of load test is probably what your QA people are thinking of when you say "load test" - and I'd hazard ...


4

You have been developing this system for 2 years and have never performed any load testing at all? Preparing for expected load is usually part of the design. At this point, you are 2 years in, and may not have any evidence that your design is capable of supporting the required load. You do have performance and load requirements, right? With any ...


1

This kind of depends on what the structure of your project actually is. So far your tests all seem concerned with the operation of the system as a whole, i.e. You appear to be doing only black box testing. If you want to test the units independently then you know need to open up the system and look inside it (white box testing). In this case you have ...


1

I would ask a number of questions before deciding when and what to load test: Where performance problems tend to occur more often in your project: at UI, backend, or integration of UI with backend? What part of your system is more stable? Horizontally, backend services or UI? How stable is the API between frontend and backend? Are there any integration ...


1

In an agile environment you can (should) replace these traditional tools by their agile equivalent. Instead of having a matrix in some documented format (eg.: Excel sheet with the requirement and there place of implementation) you can use your tests. For each requirements you are going to have some tests implemented (assuming TDD). These tests then can be ...


1

Short version Not necessarily. Long version The idea First thing to realize is what open-source means for software: the basic idea is that the source code is available. In more specific terms, someone has decided (for a new project or a running one) to share the code, i.e. every technical detail with the whole world. Furthermore, since there's ...



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