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8

The notion of "when do you" stop testing is a misnomer. The goal of QA should be to assess the risks and to report them to the team and product owner. It is up to the team to decompose the risks and assign a severity to them. Therefore the decision to stop testing is a team/product owner decision. Stopping occurs when the level of risk is at an acceptable ...


7

Having been involved in a few data migrations myself, I'd say you have a pretty good start down the right track. Creating baselines of expected behavior prior to the migration and comparing them after the migration will be useful, but as you mentioned there are a number of things that are expected to change so the results will not be exactly the same and ...


7

I would suggest that your potential customers are not looking for a detailed 'test strategy' per se, what they likely are asking for is your company's capabilities and possibly capacity to scale. For example, wrt to mobile app testing I would want to know if you are capable of running tests on emulators and devices, can you automate those tests on both ...


5

Short answer... Never. :) Long answer... When you are out of money, or the program is no longer developed. But then you still have to provide support. And that's all there is to it really. There is no other point to regard. You always have to test as long as the project is developed in some way. And then STILL. You could find legacy bugs, old bugs, ...


5

Short answer: - I use them to evaluate my understanding of a product, and to communicate my understanding of the product. Secondary (test) use is to walk through the CLD and ask typical tester "what if?" questions. Longer answer: You can use CLDs pretty much as designed - as a method for understanding the system you are testing, including assumptions as ...


5

Yes. I call them Contract Tests. One easy way to understand them: Start with tests for a specific implementation of the interface. For example, consider ArrayList implements List. You write tests for ArrayList. One test could be this: testEmptyIffZeroSize: list = new ArrayList() assert list.isEmpty() assert_equals 0, list.size() Notice that ...


4

I'd suggest setting up a ipv6 only network (you'll need an ipv6 router and a DNS server - more if you want to test across subnets). Dual Stack can be a challenge to test, as fallback to v4 may mask v6 issues. An app (assuming it uses the network) should behave the same running on ipv4 or ipv6 networks. You can also simply review the code to see if/where ip ...


4

A simple test strategy can only guarantee a simple assessment of quality. According to James Bach: The purpose of a test strategy is to clarify the major tasks and challenges of the test project. You can (and probably should) expand "tasks and challenges" to mean "goals, activities, deliverables, constraints, risks, and dependencies." Given that, your ...


4

Personally I would write a test data generator that generates unique test data and pushes into the database via a direct api call as part of the setup for each test. That way you can run multiple tests in parallel and can scale up your automated test execution. From my experience, if you are using SoapUI, you probably should be calling the applications ...


4

Instead of using SQL scripts, I would recommend using something like dbUnit for importing your test data. dbUnit will generate database dumps in XML format (this will also allow you database-independent test data). The advantage is that you can write (build) scripts that will import the dbUnit datasets, run the database update SQL scripts on them (if you ...


3

There are many cases where unit testing as you have described would not be "sufficient". (And you haven't really defined what you mean by "sufficient" in this case. Good enough to move the code to Production? Good enough to pass it on to QA? Good enough to please your boss? Good enough to feel like you did a good job? Something else?) In most practical ...


3

Not exactly. Unit testing only isolates units in isolation. In these tests all dependencies to other units are mocked or stubbed out. So how do you know those units together do what they are supposed to do? Code tends to grow hierarchically in complexity, and with that growth comes more and more units working together, more and more groups of units ...


3

Migration can be a messy process to test, and some testers might approach it half-heartedly. It is good to see that you are taking it seriously. I might think about how migration could be impacted by configuration settings. If your product has per-customer configuration settings that could impact migration, you might consider how to test an appropriate ...


3

Sounds like you could with a course in Rapid Software Testing It gives you the tools to ask pertinent questions in order to evaluate a product and provide information to the customer regarding the product. The slides are available on James Bach & Michael Bolton sites, but the greatest benefit comes from attending the course. Basically, you use a set ...


3

You should decide, as part of your product planning, what your criteria are for shipping. That includes your test bar. For some products you may say "I'll test all I can before the ship date". For others, like the products I work on, there are quite a few explicit quality metrics they have to meet, particularly in the area of security. Note that ...


3

First of all, it is understandable that a former developer might approach testing in terms of individually testable layers or sub-components. However, as a tester, if you do nothing else, you must verify that the finished product behaves correctly when exercised using whatever interfaces the end-user will use. Everything else is secondary to that -- ...


3

I gained lot of information from the question as well from all the answers. In the question, under the heading "Where the things may go wrong?" or "What may go wrong", I feel apart from functional perspective, impact on performance of the system should also be considered as you mentioned that the migration involves changes in complex data model as well file ...


2

There's some really good advice on this thread. The only thing I can add is possibly a little off-topic but still pertinent: make sure you are fresh when the production environment gets migrated. I worked on a project a while ago that switched over at four in the morning, and the testers had all worked a 9-5 day then turned up onsite for the migration at ...


2

Some great answers above and I think every one is right. The more directions you come at this the better. Have you investigated some of the semantic profiling tools like Rever? (www.rever.eu). They have a case study of a similar problem of transformation but because their tools analyse the code as well as the schema they can show the metadata structures of ...


2

You didn't mention platform. On the process side for windows apps, you can strive to create IP agnostic applications See here or here for some more ideas / elaboration. For other platforms, I would imagine there is an equally limited number of networking functions that can tie an application to IP versions - a simple script could help identify exactly where ...


1

As the other answers have said, your first task is to organize the list. There are a number of reasons you want to do this: The items may not be accurate - This is ridiculously common. What tends to happen is that the people who execute the test steps know enough about the system to adjust for flaws in the list and act accordingly. The items may not be ...


1

Even theoretically, unit testing isn't sufficient because it doesn't cover the paths through the system. You can cover every line of code in a system, but not cover every potential way through it. For instance, can you launch the application? Does it run on all the target operating systems? Does it render correctly? These are all out of the scope of unit ...


1

In this situation, we are using the approach exposed by Bruce McLeod. We use a data generator to produce 4 datasets from the same configuration defined by the test case: the input data for the test (run manually or with qtp) to fill gui forms for example, the data inserted before test with soapui in the application to create the customers on which the ...


1

You are on the right path with the "clean sheet" approach. It would be best if every test runs on empty database and it fills in data in the database as a part of its own fixture. But if you find yourself using a lot of the same kind of the data for a bunch of tests, then a XML import file would be best. Your testsuite should clear the database before each ...


1

Is there any business statistic functionality in the old and in the new system? If true you can make the same statistic in both versions and compare them. Example: the number of customers should be the same, as well as the revenue of the best and the worst customer,.. These can act as a kind of cheksum that make shure that no critical value is lost.


1

I definitely agree with #1. You may be breaking company policy by continuing to work on a project that has been cut off for funding. I don't necessarily agree with #2. How do you know no defects are found if you stop? Now, if you're saying "Go until you're out of time, and until there's no major known defects" I guess it makes sense, but if you are out of ...



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