Hot answers tagged

13

Assuming you exclude the systems used to execute the application-under-test (Operating System, Browser, etc) there are no tools a tester cannot live without. There are many tools that make testing stronger, more thorough, easier, faster, and/or more efficient. We use bug tracking tools, text reading/editing/printing tools, document storage and retrieval ...


13

I like using modern.ie (by Microsoft) because they carry all IE browsers from IE6 to IE11 and it's free. You basically choose which version of IE you want and it comes prepackaged with its own virtual machine so you don't have to install anything. Just run and test. The downside is the virtual machines are time limited and expire after a certain amount of ...


9

In my company, we use a separate test environment where we copy production data daily. This environment is periodically used to detect issues like the ones you have encountered. The vast majority of our testing is carried out with synthesized, non-production data. Some of this is produced by hand, but most is produced by scripts we build. We periodically ...


9

No. The items you mention scale very differently and there are far too many factors and resources that will get used. For instance if I time requests on a local server using an application I'll find things like 1 user = 10 second response average (time per request) 10 users = 2.5 second average 100 users = 2.5 second average 1000 users = 20 second average ...


9

Does this actually catch, before production, many of the "surprise" problems we might anticipate? Or is there a more fundamental flaw in the approach that will cause deleterious changes to pass testing and affect production? You are wise to have a test system that you can use for catching performance issues, but your "scaling" approach is flawed. ...


7

Some additional tools to the others (+1 to Phil and Joe, great suggestions) mentioned: Mind Mapping tool (e.g. XMind) Database Querying/Scripting tool (e.g. SQL Server Management Studio) Screenshot Capturing tool (e.g. PicPick, windows problem step recorder) Data Generation tool (e.g. www.generatedata.com) Notepad++ Browser specific dev tool bars (e.g. ...


6

Jing (Screens capturing tools) Small little tool that let's you record a short video of the screen. I personally use this when taking screenshots or attempting to explain an issue becomes difficult. The next best thing is to record the problem. It also saves the clip on the cloud so you don't have to worry about finding a location to host the video. ...


6

There are several ways you can work with this situation. No-work - let the tests for the new feature fail until the feature is migrated to the staging environments. This can be an option if the tests don't block builds or aren't reporting directly to management. "smart" detection - as Dale suggested, use some coding to detect whether the feature is ...


5

I'll try not to repeat any of the tools already listed. Some that I use extensively that I don't see in other answers are: Fiddler - http debugging proxy Beyond Compare - diffing tool for files or folders Perfmon, Filemon, Processmon - monitoring different parts of the SUT. Snipping Tool - screenshots


5

Presumably the database is just a piece of your overall system, and your goal is to determine whether database changes break things or slow the system down. Using a downsized database is a reasonable way to check whether database changes break things. I'm not sure it makes sense to use a downsized database for load testing. Whether this makes sense ...


4

At the risk of flogging a dead horse, this is one of those context-free questions that is tough to answer without information specific to your needs. I won't rehash what people have described about commonly used environments, but I would like to offer a few things to consider. As with most things, there are no best practices, there is what is appropriate ...


4

One more online Data Generator: TeDaGen. It supports on-the-fly generated output conversion to many different formats (XML, CSV, SQL, etc.), as well as many fields as options to generate.


4

Some tools for test data generation - online and standalone: Datagenerator - free tool, DB data / tables generation. GenerateData.com - free online script-based data gen, different output formats, including CSV, Excel and SQL. Spawner Data Generator - sample/test data for databases. More links may be found here, but the above 3 I use more often and ...


4

A simple JavaScript error might be a reason of a huge bug. I am always having “Show JavaScript errors” turned on my browser. Let’s consider the following situation: During saving a Web Form, some JavaScript exception had occurred while populating data from the UI input fields into internal JavaScript object, for instance, JSON object. In this case, some ...


4

I haven't heard of a standardized term for this technique, but it is commonly used. We do this pretty regularly at my current company, but avoided it almost completely when I worked at Microsoft, even though there were a number of cases where it could have greatly improved our ability to troubleshoot issues. At Microsoft, they considered the risk of ...


3

One of the most important tools I use all the time is virtual machines. I have a library of different test environments saved and if I need to test something in any one of those environments I just fire up that VM. The ability to snapshot the virtual machine means that I can corrupt the environment and very easily come back to a pristine state. I would hate ...


3

I've done this in many places myself, where we copied over production data because it was so very useful in troubleshooting issues that were only apparent in Customer data and it also provided additional test scenarios and data structures that we did not then need to always recreate. It's extremely useful, and if your Development Team is balking at this you ...


3

Microsoft has sample databases for exactly this purpose: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=23654 http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms124501%28v=sql.105%29.aspx There are tons of samples, tutorials and training online that all use these sample databases. It sounds like everything you want from above could be done with these and ...


3

Test data generators are especially useful when the data format is likely to change. Here is a common problem I've encountered with test data: it isn't always clear which parts of the data are intentional and which are optional. For example, suppose you want to test a CSV file of names and addresses, where each record contains a first name, last name, ...


3

You might think my answer is snarky but my brain, notebook and pen is pretty much all I need I do use other tools but none I consider 'essential'


3

I am not sure what you meant by "role" here and some elaboration would help in identifying what exactly you are looking for. Nonetheless, we usually have have the DTAP enviroments for our sprint/release cycle: D - Dev (here you can pair with devs and help write junits and do dev-box testing before commits.) T - Test (the test environment where the ...


3

I'd add the sysinternals suite to the mix - especially Process Explorer. Knowing how to use even a handful of the tools in the suite can help diagnose and discover a huge number of quality issues.


3

below is my addition to the list - tools I use very often during testing and preparations: Firebug addon for Firefox - for me it's a true *must-have* for web testing CRC/MD5 checksum creation / verification utility (I use QuickSFV, it's free and really quick) DB Clients: SQLDeveloper (for Oracle) SQL Server Management Studio (for MSSQL, was mentioned ...


3

You can also use http://www.browserstack.com/ where you can not only get older versions of IE but pretty much any browser you want.


3

There are several tools available over the web but my favourite one is Octopus Deploy, because after a relative simple configuration it can deploy your build, setting up automatically your testing environment. The configuration can be done through a user friendly interface and, it's important at least for me, it's free for a limited number of "tentacles" ...


3

Generally you should think of tests as doing Setup Execution Given X, When Y happens, Then expect Z Teardown This actually occurs at two (or more) levels: Entire test suite Certain files, constants, database commands, etc. need to be run before the entire test suite. Often there is no 'tear-down' in this area. Each test Each test should also have ...


2

Peter, great topic. I'd list some other new apps, not mentioned eariler: Altova XML Spy - great in working / processing XML files Filezilla - good FTP client with SSH support Kitty - http://www.9bis.net/kitty/?page=Download - a small SSH client, we use in viewing server logs in real-time


2

At my current company, we are a small team. We have designated a shared folder on the file system where we place these types of test assets. And we each maintain them on an as-needed basis. This approach works well enough for us. At other companies where I have worked, I had a larger team. In some of those cases, one of the roles was that of a "Test Lab ...


2

Virtualization software. You can use tools like VMWare to setup virtual machines which you then run from your existing machine. You might be on a Mac, a Linux box or a Windows machine, and from it run WinXP, Win7, Win8, Win XP /w SP1, etc. IIRC even MS has a Virtual Server which you can script to turn machines on and off, which means one script to run all ...



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