3,254 reputation
21841
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location Calgary, AB, Canada
age 27
visits member for 3 years, 5 months
seen 15 hours ago

profile for corsiKa on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites

Moderator on sqa.stackexchange - we welcome your QA questions!

Are you a part-time or freelance graphic designer looking for a lightweight project? I'm looking for some sprites :) hit me up at racket.game@gmail.com

Formally known as "glowcoder".

Seasonally known as "corsiKlause Ho Ho Ho".


Jun
9
comment When to start testing a solo project
I'm actually going with this as the answer. I know it isn't as popular as the "test now! test now!" idea, but it's very practical. I've been doing this approach for the past month now, and it's been working out well. Honestly, between a wife and daughter, work, social obligations, and R&R, I only get about 4 hours a week to work on my solo project - I certainly don't want to spend those 4 hours writing tests. But, I do want robust code. So I've been writing my code and when I run into something particularly tricky, I write the test around it.
Jun
9
accepted When to start testing a solo project
Jun
9
accepted How do you prepare yourself for a testing position?
Jun
9
asked Are code reviews considered part of QA?
Jun
8
reviewed Approve suggested edit on Newbie question: How do I run a JUnit 3 test on Portable Firefox 3.6 in Selenium RC (1.0.3)?
Jun
8
reviewed Reject suggested edit on What could cause a “command failed” error when using the Word.Application object to compare two documents?
Jun
8
comment Using Scala to build unit tests for Java?
Hey, when I'm wrong I'm wrong. A quick search verifies my misconception: You can interact with Java code seemlessly, but the Scala code itself is much different.
Jun
8
comment Any good open source test management tools ?
I wonder if it has modularity that would allow you to drop in and out components you want or don't want. Then you can develop modules you do want, but you won't have to start from scratch on it. I personally have never even heard of it, but it might be worth looking in to. At the very least, most open source projects would love experienced people helping with development! :)
Jun
8
revised is it appropriate to do exception handling for every single test method?
edited body
Jun
8
comment Using Scala to build unit tests for Java?
I could be mistaken, but I'm pretty sure it is. I know it is for Groovy (or at least, it's supposed to be - some minor inconsistencies exist.) Of course, I'm sure it comes with its own quirks - knowing syntax and knowing how to use it effective are two different things, and you will probably still experience some of the "new language jitters" when you bring people on board for Scala, regardless of if I am correct about it being a superset.
Jun
8
comment Using Scala to build unit tests for Java?
In regards to your third point, I believe all valid Java is valid Scala. There might be a couple exceptions/implementation errors, but barring that I'm pretty sure it's a complete superset. That's not to say that your point isn't a valid one to consider (especially for Java-->Clojure) but it might not be as applicable for Scala.
Jun
7
reviewed Approve suggested edit on UI and Business Logic Testing, Am I Doing it Right? Should I Unit Test Anything Else?
Jun
6
comment How do I satisfy external auditors that automated tests are at least as effective as manual tests?
It's so tough. You need to justify your time spent on the test suite, and for that you need meaningful, cost effective results. But until you can invest that time, you won't get anything back from it! It's so difficult to convince management that things like this are worth it in the long run.
Jun
3
comment In agile (Scrum) practices, where do I start with making Q&A (testing) more efficient if the team is transitioning from waterfall to agile?
Be very careful of falling into the "OMG WE HAVE TO BE AGILE" trap. Being agile isn't about confirming to some set of rules that some blogger spewed out, or following a book to the letter. It's about allowing your process to be more adaptive. I wouldn't say that a dev iteration, followed by a test iteration, couldn't be agile. For a small team it's hard to have dedicated resources for anything; you might have a dev/sales, you might have a dev/marketing, maybe a receptionist/graphics/logistics manager/sysadmin (one heck of a resource!) Agile (IMO) is more a philosophy than anything else.
Jun
3
awarded  Civic Duty
Jun
3
comment What are the advantages of automated user acceptance tests?
+1 Your opening sentence is golden. :)
Jun
2
comment What are guidelines to use for exit criteria when releasing?
As a general rule, appeals for more information on a question belong in a comment, not an answer. :) I'm not going to transition this, because there is some more to this than just clarification requests, and it's quite long and formatted so it wouldn't fit anyway! :) Just figured I'd put that out there.
Jun
2
comment Are state transition diagrams a good software testing technique
One thing to keep in mind is that sometime "states happen" when you don't want them to. For example, adding items, adding items, going to checkout, ooo wait adding more items. Sometimes, you didn't intend for this to happen, but now you're in a different state. We can call it "returned to shopping from checkout". Our diagram says we should be in "shopping" but because we've messed with the internal state, it may have gone haywire. Finding these "accidental states" can be very difficult; fixing them can be even harder!
Jun
2
comment Are state transition diagrams a good software testing technique
I love this answer. Sure, it's a bit of a read, but it's a good read!
Jun
2
comment MTBF for a software product
Manufacturing types are tough to work with as a technological type. They try to apply all the metrics from their factories to software (as if we're "stamping out widgets" or something) and yet don't accept analogies when they apply. For example, I hear every week "We're not a software shop." Yet, when they hear "Would you use bad mechanics practices just because you don't make machinery?" they'll say "well that's completely different..." Oh, oh I see. The bottom line is, they understand manufacturing. They don't understand software. They'll misread any metrics you give them.