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Of-course you should a try to answer all questions in a job interview and if you don't know you can answer that you don't know, much better then making up bullshit. It might be good to openly question how this question relates to the job offering if you think its outside of the scope of the actual job.

In this case with SDLC I would expect all team members in a software development team to have a basic understanding of software development lifecycles and what their part in it is. Thus I think this is a perfectly goodvalid question to ask an automated tester.

With answering any question you could try steer towards something else like the STLC and explain how this more important for you as an automated tester.

Of-course you should a try to answer all questions in a job interview and if you don't know you can answer that you don't know, much better then making up bullshit. It might be good to openly question how this question relates to the job offering if you think its outside of the scope of the actual job.

In this case with SDLC I would expect all team members in a software development team to have a basic understanding of software development lifecycles and what their part in it is. Thus I think this is a perfectly good question to ask an automated tester.

With answering any question you could try steer towards something else like the STLC and explain how this more important for you as an automated tester.

Of-course you should a try to answer all questions in a job interview and if you don't know you can answer that you don't know, much better then making up bullshit. It might be good to openly question how this question relates to the job offering if you think its outside of the scope of the actual job.

In this case with SDLC I would expect all team members in a software development team to have a basic understanding of software development lifecycles and what their part in it is. Thus I think this is a perfectly valid question to ask an automated tester.

With answering any question you could try steer towards something else like the STLC and explain how this more important for you as an automated tester.

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source | link

Of-course you should a try to answer all questions in a job interview and if you don't know you can answer that you don't know, much better then making up bullshit. It might be good to openly question how this question relates to the job offering if you think its outside of the scope of the actual job.

In this case with SDLC I would expect all team members in a software development team to have a basic understanding of software development lifecycles and what their part in it is. Thus I think this is a perfectly good question to ask an automated tester.

With answering any question you could try steer towards something else like the STLC and explain how this more important for you as an automated tester.