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Can anyone share information on who to setup new SQA department in an organisation? Multiple Development group exist and most of the QA job has been performed by developer themselves.

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This is a pretty big question.

Typically, the Test Manager (or a variation of the name) would setup the testing function and, depending on the organisation (and budget), could be outsourced or done by a third party.

If there's no dedicated QA within the organisation now, I'm going to assume there's no budget either. Have you considered going straight to UAT? It's not a perfect solution, but your application would be tested. It'd still need a test coordinator / UAT lead... as my current client's finding out.

Within the test team itself, you might have several members with differing specialisms; functional, non-functional, automation, performance, security, etc., covering the different phases; system, system integration, regression, etc. with different methodologies; V-Model, Waterfall, Agile, etc.

My point is: It's not easy, or cheap. You'll need lots of time and direction from the business. I'm not sure if we'll be able to give you a definitive answer here, unfortunately.

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Don't.

Modern software development does not have a separate QA department. QA should be part of the development team. Quality is whole team approach not that of the QA department.

Testing no longer means testing

Confused? We can imagine! The purpose of testing used to be fairly clear–“Testing is the process of executing a program with the intent of finding errors” [Meyers79]. This changes when adopting agile and lean development.

Read more: https://less.works/less/technical-excellence/thinking-about-testing.html

Place QA people into the development teams, or even better teach the development teams to do better QA. Who should hire these people? The development facilitation manager.

Maybe a single lead QA strategist in a organisation, but even then each team might create their own best QA practises for their domain, product, etc... Guess I dislike that just as much as Software Architects. :)

  • Depending on the project context, and if you want/need certain certification, I think it's good to have a separated testing team alongside the intra-team testers. I can think of limitation (physical or technical) of using certain hardware or technique that can be dealt by specialists belonging to the whole company. – João Farias Apr 25 '17 at 23:14
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    @JoãoGFarias Each company and industry might have its own challenges and solutions, but as a general rule not having a separate QA team is better. Handovers between teams generate 50% knowledge loss on average, not even talking about dependencies and bottlenecks in your flow. If QA is very important for example due to extreme regulations or cannot be automated easily, creating a team with not common developers/QA ratio (e.g. 2vs4, instead of the common 5vs1) may make sense. First research if you can prevent creating silos, probably YAGNI en.wikipedia.org/wiki/You_aren%27t_gonna_need_it – Niels van Reijmersdal Apr 26 '17 at 7:37

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