1

We have several "testers" who are involved in manual testing and test automation, but all of that part-time. Some of them are not really interested in testing and test automation as a field and lose interest in test automation and improving testing skills pretty quickly.

How should we deal with them? Is it okay to have a part-time not-motivated tester? Is there anything we can do to raise their interest in testing and test automation?

  • 1
    How did they fill that role to begin with? Were they hired as such, or "voluntold" for that work? – c32hedge Aug 11 '17 at 21:03
  • 2
    Do they have a manager? Is manager OK with that? This is more a question for workplace exchange or project management. If they don't report to you, there is little you can do. IIRC there are some questions on workplace exchange about how to deal with colleagues who are not motivated. Basically, their manager can, but you cannot. – Peter M. Aug 11 '17 at 21:11
  • @PeterMasiar thank you. Well, as it currently stands, I am their manager at the moment. I am not sure I am okay or not - the problem is, they still do contribute at a minimum required level, but they are not motivated enough to learn new things and start to contribute more complicated automated tests. I still think that's my problem and I am not doing a great job making them interested and wanting to develop themselves in the testing and test automation space. Need some guidelines and advices. Thanks. – alecxe Aug 12 '17 at 2:07
  • @c32hedge well, let's say they knew someone who works here :) In any case, this is what we have now and we have to deal with it. Thanks. – alecxe Aug 12 '17 at 3:55
5

We have several "testers" who are involved in manual testing and test automation, but all of that part-time. Some of them are not really interested in testing and test automation as a field and lose interest in test automation and improving testing skills pretty quickly.

How should we deal with them?

That depends on why you have uninterested testers.

If this situation exists because you are bad at hiring people, then you need to get better at attracting and hiring folks who want to work hard and be professional testers.

If this situation exists because you pay poorly, you might need to pay more to attract better people.

If this situation exists because you treat your "testers" (it's telling that you put the word in quotes) like second-class citizens, then you may need to treat them more professionally.

Knowing how to "deal" with almost anything requires first understanding how you got there.

Is it okay to have a part-time not-motivated tester?

"Okay" is always a business decision.

I've seen some companies who decide that they don't really care enough to pay and hire real, professional QAers. For them it appears that part-time, uninterested testers check the checkbox well enough.

Other companies value testers and do things differently.

Is there anything we can do to raise their interest in testing and test automation?

Again it depends.

The answers ranges from "No, there's nothing you can do", to "Fire them all and hire full-time professionals" with everything in between.

  • @alecxe - you indicate that your role is manager. I sense that you haven't managed QA/Testers before, right? Are you a Development manager or such? – Joe Strazzere Aug 12 '17 at 21:11
  • Well, I do testing and test automation as a part of my job and, as it turned out I had to naturally transit into managing several QA/Testers (QA team is just several people). This is still only a part of my responsibilities (our team overall is small and I have to be more like a jack-of-all-trades). But, as it happened, some time ago we were hiring part-time testers without or with just a bit of experience - they are at this point in time not super-interested in developing QA and test automation skills doing basically the bare minimum. This is still my fault, I am not paying enough attention. – alecxe Aug 12 '17 at 21:27
  • This might help: allthingsquality.com/2012/05/… – Joe Strazzere Aug 12 '17 at 21:31

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.