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What have the experts and career professionals learned in this field, what wise nuggets of information can be passed on and what has been learned from real experiences ?

What advice from experienced professionals in the field can help me in driving change within organization and contribute to a testing mindset?

How can I be a leader in this space?

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Look to the big picture of people and quality, not just 'testing'

  • Focus on capabilities, not maturity. Accelerate. Nicole Forsgen PhD
  • See the Work with Big Visible Charts. Behind Closed Doors. Johanna Rothman
  • Presence is a foundation for trust. The Mind of the Leader. Rasmus Hougard
  • You cannot manage other people unless you manage yourself first. Peter Drucker
  • Never Pitch an Idea— Always Present an Outcome. This might get me fired. Gregory Larkin
  • First is the sheer joy of making things... The Mythical Man Month. Frederick P Brooks Jr
  • If You Can’t Launch in Eight Weeks, You Never Will. This might get me fired. Gregory Larkin
  • Silence is a greatly underestimated source of power. Leading With Emotional Courage. Peter Bregman
  • Building this might get me fired. And I’m doing it anyway. This might get me fired. Gregory Larkin
  • To rewire your mind, the first step is to understand how your mind works. Rewire Your Mind. Steven Schuster
  • These are the four magic words of management: “What do you think?” Woody Morcott, Former CEO, Dana Corporation
  • Metrics drive dynamics. How human are yours in your company? From Hierarchy to High Performance. Doug Kirkpatrick
  • The two biggest barriers to good decision making are your ego and your blind spots. Principles: Life and Work. Ray Dalio
  • Remember, the clarity of your guidance gets measured at the other person’s ear, not at your mouth. Radical Candor. Kim Scott
  • Every commit should trigger a build of the software and running a set of fast, automated tests. Accelerate. Nicole Forsgen Phd
  • VUCA - Variability, Uncertainty, Complexity and Ambiguity are unavoidable parts of adventuring. How to fight a Hydra. Josh Kaufman
  • Foster a respectful, supportive work environment that emphasizes learning from failures rather than blaming. Accelerate. Nicole Forsgen PhD
  • A business leader’s job is to create great teams that do amazing work on time. That’s it. That’s the job of management. Powerful. Patty McChord
  • Awareness is the first step. Become aware of your physical habits and how you display your emotional state. Behind Closed Doors. Johanna Rothman
  • The first barrier in almost any kind of self-improvement comes from the ego’s need to protect itself. The Art of Clear Thinking. Patrick King
  • Self- expression, experimentation, and a sense of purpose: these are the switches that light up our seeking systems. Alive At Work. Daniel Cable
  • For jobs where learning or collaboration is required for success, fear is not an effective motivator. The Fearless Organization. Amy C. Edmondson
  • If you fill the room, they can’t take the space. And when you leave, you’ll leave behind a big empty space. The mind of the leader. Rasmus Hougaard
  • Being transparent and telling people what they need to hear is the only way to ensure they both trust you and understand you. Powerful. Patty McChord
  • Lifelong learners overcome a natural human tendency to shy away from or abandon habits that produce short-term pain. Leading Change. John P. Kotter
  • Faced with the choice between changing one’s mind and proving there is no need to do so, almost everyone gets busy on the proof. John Kenneth Galbraith
  • Speaking up is only the first step. The true test is how leaders respond when people actually do speak up. The Fearless Organization. Amy C. Edmondson
  • Nothing undermines change more than behavior by important individuals that is inconsistent with the verbal communication. Leading Change. John P. Kotter
  • Communicating more of the same when people aren’t listening or accepting our message doesn’t seem like a smart way to work. Great At Work. Morten Hansen
  • One of the mistakes of the Waterfall process was... to remove some of the responsibility for quality from the developers. A seat at the table. Mark Swartz
  • Unless a leader expressly and actively makes it psychologically safe to do so, people will seek to avoid failure. The Fearless Organization. Amy C. Edmondson
  • Psychological safety is about candor, about making it possible for productive disagreement and free exchange of ideas. The Fearless Organization. Amy C. Edmondson
  • People rarely become defensive simply because of what you’re saying. They only become defensive when they no longer feel safe. Crucial Conversations. Kerry Paterson
  • Surprisingly, one of the most powerful risk-management techniques introduced in the Agile world is the idea of testing in production. A seat at the table. Mark Swartz
  • Ignoring their sense of exasperation and moving on with the plan usually leads to resistance or resentment. The 5 lamgauges of Appreciation in the workplace. Gary Chapman
  • Think about it this way: If you fill the room, they can’t take the space. And when you leave, you’ll leave behind a big empty space. The Mind of the Leader. Rasmus Hougard
  • Our internal research shows that public recognition is one of the least favorite forms of receiving appreciation. The 5 lamgauges of Appreciation in the workplace. Gary Chapman
  • Dropping five to ten minutes off the meeting length allows for transition time and helps mitigate future meeting lateness. The Surprising Science of Meetings. Steven G. Rogelberg
  • Our research also found that developing off trunk/ master rather than on long- lived feature branches was correlated with higher delivery performance. Accelerate. Nicole Forsgen Phd
  • “The language of planning and control, of targets and KPIs, of metrics and benchmarks... betrays a way of thinking unsuited to the challenges today. Jules Goddard, London Business School_
  • "Testing by itself does not improve software quality. Test results are an indicator of quality, but in and of themselves, they don’t improve it. Managing the Unmanageable. Steve Mcconnell
  • Deep practice is built on a paradox: struggling in certain targeted ways— operating at the edges of your ability, where you make mistakes— makes you smarter. The Talent Code. Daniel Coyle
  • It is easy to fall into the habit of persuasion by argument. But arguing does not change minds – if anything, it makes people more intransigent. Leading With Emotional Courage. Peter Bregman
  • Even before the meeting gets underway, the leader should actively greet attendees and help folks feel welcome, appreciated, and needed. The Surprising Science of Meetings. Steven G. Rogelberg
  • Self- leadership is about managing ourselves, so we can better lead our people, creating more meaning, connectedness, and a more people- centered culture. The mind of the leader. Rasmus Hougaard
  • One of the most important things to keep in mind, wherever you work, is that the failure of an employee to speak up in a crucial moment cannot be seen. The Fearless Organization. Amy C. Edmondson
  • Each one of your supporting points should open with entertaining anecdotes, fascinating facts, compelling statistics, great metaphors, examples, and analogies. The Charisma Myth. Olivia Fox Cabane
  • Embracing radical truth and radical transparency will bring more meaningful work and more meaningful relationships. I have found that it typically takes about eighteen months. Principles. Ray Dalio
  • Physical clutter is a manifestation of mental and emotional clutter, while physical clutter triggers mental clutter. If you cut one, the other one will get cleaner too. Rewire Your Mind. Steven Schuster
  • Using play and experimentation to activate employees’ seeking systems is a necessary skill for leaders who need their organization to adapt and thrive in a changing environment. Alive At Work. Daniel Cable
  • Instead of enforcing standards, think about proven practices as defaults. Defaults are exactly like standards with one exception: you don’t have use them. The Surprising Science of Meetings. Steven G. Rogelberg.
  • Speak up, own it, or get out. In an idea meritocracy, openness is a responsibility; you not only have the privilege to speak up and “fight for right” but are obliged to do so. Principles: Life and Work. Ray Dalio
  • If you fire your skill circuits the right way— by trying hard to do things you can barely do, in deep practice— then your skill circuits will respond by getting faster and more fluent. The Talent Code. Daniel Coyle
  • By the time most people reach the age of thirty, they have experienced so much conditioning and so many painful experiences their realm of possibility has been dramatically reduced. Rewire Your Mind. Steven Schuster
  • At the heart of almost all chronic problems in our organizations, our teams, and our relationships lie crucial conversations— ones that we’re either not holding or not holding well. Crucial Conversations. Kerry Paterson
  • Research has found that people in the same meeting end up sharing moods within two hours... whether that mood is good or bad... because of a group of neurons called mirror neurons. The Mind of the Leader. Rasmus Hougard
  • Psychological safety describes a belief that neither the formal nor informal consequences of interpersonal risks, like asking for help or admitting a failure, will be punitive. The Fearless Organization. Amy C. Edmondson
  • While most managers, supervisors, and colleagues genuinely appreciate the people with whom they work, they often neglect to verbally express that appreciation. The 5 lamgauges of Appreciation in the Workplace. Gary Chapman
  • Just after we observe what others do and just before we feel some emotion about it, we tell ourselves a story. We add meaning, guess at motives. We also add judgment— is that good or bad? Crucial Conversations. Kerry Paterson
  • The basic premises of management today: Building loyalty and retention and career progression and implementing structures to ensure employee engagement and happiness. None of that is the job of management. Powerful. Patty McChord
  • Vacation decisions always involve respecting your colleagues, but when you take away a fixed pool, you invite new comparisons, competition, martyrdom, burnout, and turnover. How F*cked up is your management. _Johnathan Nightingale _
  • A few simple, uncommon, powerful phrases that anyone can utter to make the workplace feel just a tiny bit more psychologically safe: I don't know. I need help. I made a mistake. I'm sorry. The Fearless Organization. Amy C. Edmondson
  • Most of us feel we can’t tell the people who work for us or with us the truth because (a) they’re not smart enough to understand it, (b) they’re not mature enough to understand it, or (c) it wouldn’t be nice. Powerful. Patty McChord
  • Activity is not the same as productivity. When we complete a task, even the smallest insignificant task like sending an email, dopamine is released in the brain. This can make the task addictive. The Mind of the Leader. Rasmus Hougard
  • You manifest what you model. Your people are not only watching your every move, they are emulating you. And, unfortunately, you don’t get to pick and choose which parts they copy. How F*cked up is your management. Johnathan Nightingale
  • Why are passion and persistence key ingredients of talent? A: Because wrapping myelin around a big circuit requires immense energy and time. If you don't love it, you'll never work hard enough to be great. The Talent Code. Daniel Coyle
  • You have to accept that anger, for example, is not something you can eradicate from your life. Don’t fight against something you can’t change. What you can change are the thoughts which sustain anger. Rewire Your Mind. Steven Schuster
  • Why is targeted, mistake- focused practice so effective? A: Because the best way to build a good circuit is to fire it, attend to mistakes, then fire it again, over and over. Struggle is... a biological requirement. The Talent Code. Daniel Coyle
  • We tend to have meetings in the same room, at the same time, with the same people, in the same chairs, with the same general meeting approaches and processes. This can result in stale meetings. The Surprising Science of Meetings. Steven G. Rogelberg
  • Companies that manage themselves through statistics rather than collective accomplishment are guilty of creating unsafe workplaces that suppress the creative expression employees need for rapid response. From Hierarchy to High Performance. Doug Kirkpatrick

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