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I'm working with an automated script for multiple checkboxes that has dependent permissions.

Given there are multiple checkboxes

  • Checkbox A
  • Checkbox B
  • Checkbox C
  • Checkbox D
  • Checkbox E

When I select Checkbox A Then Checkbox C and Checkbox E is selected

I've handled this using a switch statement because there are multiple combinations but its kind of messy because certain checkbox(es) are not only selected but disabled as well due to the dependent permissions:

e.g.

    public boolean multipleCheckboxVerification(String roleName) {
    switch (roleName) {
        case CheckboxA:
            return permissionPage.isSelectedChkA() && permissionPage.isSelectedChkC()
                    && permissionPage.isSelectedChkE() && !permissionPage.isEnabledChkC() && !permissionPage.isEnabledChk();}

May I kindly know if there is a cleaner way to return which checkbox isn't as expected?

I'm currently just using assertTrue from TestNG but the output seems to be vague of which checkbox is actually failing.

I was looking for an output where the error message would display "Checkbox E is enabled where it should be disabled"

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You can Replace Conditional with Polymorphism.

class Checkboxes {
  // ...
  Boolean multipleCheckboxVerification() {
    switch (roleName) {
      case CheckboxA:
        return permissionPage.isSelectedChkA() && permissionPage.isSelectedChkC()
                && permissionPage.isSelectedChkE() && !permissionPage.isEnabledChkC() && !permissionPage.isEnabledChk();
      case CheckboxB:
        return !permissionPage.isSelectedChkA() && permissionPage.isSelectedChkC()
                && permissionPage.isSelectedChkE() && !permissionPage.isEnabledChkC() && !permissionPage.isEnabledChk();
       ....
    }
  }
}

Refactoring...

abstract class Checkbox {
  // ...
  abstract Boolean isValid(Page permissionPage);
  abstract String getErrorMessage();
}

class CheckboxA extends Checkbox {
  Boolean isValid(Page permissionpage) {
    return permissionPage.isSelectedChkA() && permissionPage.isSelectedChkC()
                    && permissionPage.isSelectedChkE() && !permissionPage.isEnabledChkC() && !permissionPage.isEnabledChk();
  }
  String getErrorMessage() { return "Checkbox A is enabled where it should be disabled"; }
}
class CheckboxB extends Checkbox {
  Boolean isValid(Page permissionpage) {
    return !permissionPage.isSelectedChkA() && permissionPage.isSelectedChkC()
                    && permissionPage.isSelectedChkE() && !permissionPage.isEnabledChkC() && !permissionPage.isEnabledChk();
  }
  String getErrorMessage() { return "Checkbox B is enabled where it should be disabled"; }
}

This way, you can keep your swtich statements only as new CheckboxA().isValid() or new CheckboxA().getErrorMessage(), e.g.

If you need to create a new checkbox, you just need to create a new class and add it to switch statement.

If you need to create further specific cases of CheckboxA, e.g., you can just create a new class and override the methods.

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For meaningful message, You can use Assert.fail("Checkbox E is enabled where it should be disabled") instead of AssertTrue inside your function permissionPage.isSelectedChkE().

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