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I am having a problem with test cases. I have never tested before the forms that add tables in relational database and I am not sure what is the good approach - should I write down test cases that coverage all data types like int, float, boolean etc. or just those visible on this screen? I don't know how to start, maybe negative tests like

what happens if user doesn't enter schema or name?

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I will be gratefull for any ideas that will guide me to take good approach

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  • Just start with some of the ideas you have and build on them. Let yourself be inspired by tests you have already thought about and executed. You can hardly come up with all sensible ideas beforehand. – pavelsaman Sep 21 '20 at 16:43
  • Thanks @pavelsaman but still I can't find any good examples and the point is that I can't be sure that my tests will be correct or not and I don't know where to find such info what should be tested exactly, whats in the scope when it comes to forms related to databases such as MySQL, Oracle etc that is why I am asking for any idea – nieudacznik toja Sep 21 '20 at 17:31
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I would start from analyzing the DDL statement of creating a table in your particular rdbms. For example below is the syntax for plsql:

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So using this grammar and digging into the grammar components you can learn what are the mandatory data for creating a table and what is optional.

Then you start applying standard test design practices like equivalence partitioning etc. to optimize your test suite. This is how you build up your positive suite.

Then you can start touching negative side. Like what if:

  • the table already exists
  • column names contain commas (test for not breaking DDL statement that is to be executed using your form data)
  • your user does not have privilege for creating a table
  • your table refer to the objects which either do not exist or not visible for your user
  • etc.
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should I write down test cases that coverage all data types like int, float, boolean etc. or just those visible on this screen?

It depends on the risks and components you want to investigate.

If you are testing the UI in isolation, most probably you need to deal with what is visible (or more precisely, what can be visible).

However, if you are investigating the backend*, you may want to use a different set of inputs (a superset of the UI), especially if the backend can be called from different sources that the UI.

I don't know how to start, maybe negative tests like

The test design technique that you are looking for is called Combination Testing, which focuses on ways to test several variables together, emphasizing combinatorial approaches (such as all-pairs). Cem Kaner provides some short videos and reading suggestions on this on the BBST Course site.

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* Not necessarily a remote program called through the network

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