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We are moving all manual testers to automation. I am very familiar with 'concepts' but really need a beginners step into automation for new API Service and endpoints. The developer is coding a new API service. I will be assigned to write the first automation test for testing the endpoints and the tools to be used are Pycharm w/ Pytest. Implementation of code is using Python. Can you tell me for someone needed to get up to speed and create automation test for their API's where do I start?

The tools QA is using to get code repos are GitHub. I have a repo in my Pycharm v8.0.

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  • Pycharm is just the editor to edit your tests. GitHub is just a place to share your tests with others. Pytest is a Python library to implement your tests. You haven't said what's your programming background and skills.
    – dzieciou
    May 6 at 20:00
  • The newest version of PyCharm is 2021.1. I would double check if you are really using PyCharm v8.0
    – dzieciou
    May 6 at 20:02
  • What's your background in testing APIs? How did you tested them so far? Which tools have you used to test them?
    – dzieciou
    May 6 at 20:05
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    "We are moving all manual testers to automation" - be very careful here. Automation will probably make your team more productive, but you can't automate everything, especially imagination. I know that's not relevant to your question, but just keep it in mind!
    – corsiKa
    May 8 at 17:11
  • Sorry about that. I am very new to programming. I have great conceptual understanding but have not yet applied it to real work yet. Lot's of tutorials, etc. May 10 at 13:35
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Testing APIs is potentially endless, just like almost anything in testing. I recommend focusing on one area rather than drowning yourself in something completely new. That would be a recipe for failure.

If you're completely new to the world of APIs, I recommend installing Postman (or any other client) and playing around with some endpoints for a bit. No need to start looking for any bugs yet, you need to learn what endpoints mean, how to interact with them etc. It won't hurt you if you read something about HTTP protocol, since you need to know (sooner or later) that as well.

Having said that, you can focus on many different things when testing APIs, a good starting point could be found here.

Then you asked specifically about Python. I don't know what your experience with the language is, but you need to know at least some basics before jumping in to create an automation suite for that API of yours. What I've used throughout some of the projects I've worked on is a combination of Python, pytest, and of course requests library for actually sending requests to the API. You'd probably need to read pytest documentation and search for further examples as you go.

Regarding PyCharm. That's a concrete tool you can use for typing your code in. I don't think this is important to discuss in this context. Different people use different IDEs, what matters is how well you can handle your tools. If you are efficient in PyCharm, fine, use it, if not, you can choose something else like VSCode.

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  • This is al very great information. I will take some time to try and get my head wrapped around the info. I really appreciate your help. May 10 at 13:42
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What is an API:?

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API architectural styles

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What to Test

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    This isn't all that relevant to the OP's problem: the OP wants advice on getting started with API testing using specific tools, not what something that looks more like a general guide to API testing. Please edit your answer.
    – Kate Paulk
    May 7 at 13:00
  • Ops get confused because they are not aware what to test , other than that's there is no much complications to start with api testing
    – PDHide
    May 7 at 18:06
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    Thank you so much. I have used several IDEs and really like Pycharm It is very rich in feature, but with some reading on jetbrains, i can maneuver. I think my struggles come now in connecting the dots to get forward momentum. Playing around with it, learning how to use it, that seems to just be the next natural step May 10 at 13:40
  • @ZenobiaBomani divide the problems into smaller once and try to solve one by one . see it as parts not whole
    – PDHide
    May 10 at 15:33
  • Thank you @PDHide. First things first. May 11 at 16:38

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