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Python is an interpreted, general-purpose high-level programming language whose design philosophy emphasizes code readability.

1
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): self.driver.get(DEST_URL) titles = ( 'Apache HTTP Server Test Page powered by CentOS', 'Apache2 Debian Default Page: It works') self.assertTrue(self.driver.title in titles) And if my unittest guess was not correct, you could use the regular python assert: assert self.driver.title in titles …
answered Mar 16 '17 by Todor Minakov
2
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The most solid approach would be to render it, and see what's the style; and that's easier than it sounds :) There's a Javascript method getComputedStyle which should do the heavy lifting for you - i …
answered Mar 17 '17 by Todor Minakov
1
vote
You are right robotframework is very suitable for web/GUI testing, yet - it's hardly limited to that. True that the majority of the users (myself including) utilize it mainly for that - and that's bec …
answered Mar 24 '17 by Todor Minakov
0
votes
To iterate the same as in the other answers - the mist solid approach is to start from a known (clean) state of the system, test the sign up, and wipe all modifications at the end. Thus you can constr …
answered Mar 16 '17 by Todor Minakov
2
votes
return the 1st, [1] the 2nd, and so on; now, python also supports negative indices in the access - what they mean is "start from the back". So for a list variable lst, accessing lst[-1] will get … indices, one would get the length of the list, and access the element at that position minus one (in most languages the list/arrays are zero based, e.g. the first element is at position 0). In python
answered Mar 31 '18 by Todor Minakov