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The purpose of using any test automation tool is to fail when the assertion fails. However, how you write your tests also matter. It's recommended when writing tests to use the FIRST principle. FIRST stands for: Fast Independent or Isolated Repeatable Self-validating Thorough or Timely In regards to the question: "I don't want to stop the test ...


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*** Test Cases *** One Return Value ${ret} = Return One Value argument Multiple Values ${a} ${b} ${c} = Return Three Values @{list} = Return Three Values ${scalar} @{rest} = Return Three Values *** Keywords *** Return One Value [Arguments] ${arg} ${value}= Set Variable 1 [Return] ${value} ...


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Use soft assertions. At the end of both test cases, you may do a softAssert.assertAll() which will also list out the failed test case for you. @Test public void softAssert(){ SoftAssert softAssertion= new SoftAssert(); System.out.println("softAssert Method Was Started"); softAssertion.assertTrue(false); System....


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An effective tester knows both and knows how to use one to amplify the effectiveness of the other.


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