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176 votes

Should a tester feel bad about finding too many defects/bugs in the product?

There is only one situation where a tester should feel guilty about finding too many bugs in a product, and that's if all the bugs that are found are symptoms of the same bug. I was working on a game ...
RomSteady's user avatar
  • 1,731
44 votes
Accepted

Asking a developer to be explicit about how a bug was fixed

I would operate under the assumption that your developers are documenting this somewhere, since I would also assume that they are good developers who care about good development practices. As a ...
c32hedge's user avatar
  • 2,689
34 votes

Should a tester feel bad about finding too many defects/bugs in the product?

Your job is to find bugs that could negatively impact those using the program, and in the health arena, these bugs could also potentially impact patients as well. If you find flaws and true bugs that ...
NZKshatriya's user avatar
32 votes

Should a tester feel bad about finding too many defects/bugs in the product?

I'm going to address what I feel is the elephant in the room here because none of the other answers has really mentioned it yet. Note that this answer is based on the wording of the question. I may be ...
Nzall's user avatar
  • 485
29 votes

How to respond to requests to retest, in hope that the bug is gone?

As a developer, not a QAist, I have a responsibility to provide software that meets the specs, with as few errors as possible. From my perspective, QA has the responsibility to inform me of any errors ...
dotancohen's user avatar
26 votes

Should a tester feel bad about finding too many defects/bugs in the product?

Is there someone responsible for deciding what bugs should be fixed? If so, how do they feel about it? Is there a specification that the software is not meeting? You need to log everything that is ...
David Cain's user avatar
26 votes
Accepted

Who is responsible for pinpointing bugs?

If request sounds reasonable (which includes taking into account my other priorities), I would spend some more time researching. If not reasonable, I will respond "sorry this is the best I can", and ...
Peter M. - stands for Monica's user avatar
23 votes

Should a tester feel bad about finding too many defects/bugs in the product?

Obviously you shouldn't feel bad for doing your job. As for feeling good and being sure you really are doing your job well however there are a number of other things you can consider. Your feelings ...
Michael Durrant's user avatar
20 votes

How to respond to requests to retest, in hope that the bug is gone?

I see several possible problems here: There are reported bugs that the test team can apparently reproduce but the development team has trouble finding/fixing. This suggests that there is insufficient ...
Kate Paulk's user avatar
  • 31.5k
20 votes

User reports a bug, send it to QA first or Programmer first?

It depends Each company has its own process for handling customer-reported defects. The one I'm most familiar with is more or less as follows: Customer support person attempts to reproduce defect and ...
Kate Paulk's user avatar
  • 31.5k
19 votes

How to convince project managers that onboarding a tester early is important?

In this situation - unfortunately - your best option is the slow and painful method. I've used it as a general tester, and for test automation. The way I approach this is to use these techniques: ...
Kate Paulk's user avatar
  • 31.5k
17 votes

Should a tester feel bad about finding too many defects/bugs in the product?

Simple answer 'NO!' Complex answer 'No, provided you are doing the following...:' You are reporting relevant bugs (i.e. deviation from requirements) or things which can be shown to impact functional ...
Tufty's user avatar
  • 423
17 votes

User reports a bug, send it to QA first or Programmer first?

It depends on your policy if you have one. It could go either way. It could also be that it goes to the PO and they should approve it before continuing with the fix or putting it in the backlog.
Mate Mrše's user avatar
  • 4,119
14 votes

Who is responsible for pinpointing bugs?

It depends. As Joe Strazzere explained, it is a matter of discussion between devs and testers. The question is what factors to consider in such a discussion. I think Danny R. Faught explained that ...
dzieciou's user avatar
  • 10.5k
14 votes

Asking a developer to be explicit about how a bug was fixed

Request a meeting between upper management of QA and DEV and explain the goals of what you are asking. I think the description you provided in the question is a good start at explaining the why of the ...
JeffC's user avatar
  • 288
12 votes

Should a tester feel bad about finding too many defects/bugs in the product?

You should not stop finding bugs. You may want to adjust how you report them. As RomSteady pointed out, creating a ticket for each failed link when all have the same root cause is not efficient, and ...
John Oglesby's user avatar
11 votes

Should a tester feel bad about finding too many defects/bugs in the product?

If this is a medical application you are talking about it is serious stuff. What if the bugs affected real users? Developers would be much less happy if they put in life threat someone or if ...
CoffeDeveloper's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

Signal to noise ratio during early testing

Greater communication between dev and qa so that qa already knows about wip issues. Communicate first in person where there is disagreement, then document the agreement. Clear definition on what ...
Michael Durrant's user avatar
9 votes

Who is responsible for pinpointing bugs?

Many companies I've worked for shared a policy... ...and that policy is: Testers are free to consult with developers while attempting to characterize, isolate or reproduce anomalous behavior. Once a ...
MrWonderful's user avatar
9 votes

Asking a developer to be explicit about how a bug was fixed

Most other answers suggest that requirement to be better in testing is understanding the code - but that requires skills what most QA testers do not possess. Deep understanding the code is not ...
Peter M. - stands for Monica's user avatar
9 votes

User reports a bug, send it to QA first or Programmer first?

It depends on the company to company and it's organizational work culture. In my current and previous companies, When a end user reports a bug first it goes/assigned it the QA team. Then the QA team ...
Bharat Mane's user avatar
  • 6,775
8 votes

User reports a bug, send it to QA first or Programmer first?

First of all users should report using a reporting system, they should not be aware where does it go. From there it depends on the size of your company, the product and how mature it is, the SLA you ...
Rsf's user avatar
  • 7,089
7 votes

Should a tester feel bad about finding too many defects/bugs in the product?

No, of-course not, not even when you find defects in an application that you already tested and did not change. Think about it this way, you keep growing and learning. So you will find better ways to ...
Niels van Reijmersdal's user avatar
7 votes

Who is responsible for pinpointing bugs?

But, what are the general ways to avoid having or deal with such conflicts keeping the relationship between the teams healthy and productive? Both QA management and Development management must ...
Joe Strazzere's user avatar
7 votes

Asking a developer to be explicit about how a bug was fixed

It seems that this question has two answers depending on the qualities of your QA team. If your QA team can read code, they can look at the commit(s) where the bugs are fixed - if you use a version ...
Renzeee's user avatar
  • 335
7 votes

How to respond to requests to retest, in hope that the bug is gone?

Most issue trackers have a closed reason of "obsolete". This kind of situation is exactly what that status is for: the bug was reproducible, but no longer is, and you don't know exactly when or how it ...
StackOverthrow's user avatar
7 votes

User reports a bug, send it to QA first or Programmer first?

Generally, there are 3 "stages" in handling a bug report, even if they are all carried out by a single person. These are: attempt to reproduce the bug, determine if it can be reproduced as ...
Dragonel's user avatar
  • 171
6 votes

Should a tester feel bad about finding too many defects/bugs in the product?

I suggest you to reconsider what is a bug and what is not a bug. Maybe your coworkers are just lazy or hurt by the criticism. If that's the only thing going on - that's their problem. But maybe some ...
Džuris's user avatar
  • 161
6 votes

How can testers motivate developers to write unit tests?

Unit test are far superior in detecting root cause of the bug, compared to e2e tests. Maybe I am lucky, but our developers are religious about adding unit tests - because they experienced that it ...
Peter M. - stands for Monica's user avatar
6 votes
Accepted

How can testers motivate developers to write unit tests?

It starts with explaining developers to take their discipline serious. They should follow the programmers oath. I will produce, with each release, a quick, sure, and repeatable proof that every ...
Niels van Reijmersdal's user avatar

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