6

For a QA guild I would consider some of the following: Book clubs Brown Bags Lunch and Learns Demos to non-guild members Rewards, awards and presents Internal Testing Conference Day External Conference Group Outings Bi-weekly meetings on topics of interest Mugs, hats. t-shirts, etc. with QA guild on them Slack channels within the existing workspace (or ...


5

Virtual Knowledge Area teams: We have been experimenting with setting up Virtual Knowledge Area teams (e.g. communities/guilds) as actual Scrum teams. The team consists of specialists or people who like to get deeper knowledge in the teams' topic area. They have a Product Owner, a person who creates a backlog and has the final say in prioritization of the ...


4

What kind of 'clicked' in one of my last companies was when we made special test squad teams (3-4 people) with great titles like 'QA Ninjas'. These were supposed to be 'earned' with clearly visible process improvements and creative technical or non-technical solutions. It was 'fueled' with great recognition, quarterly monetary/rewards, based on all QA + ...


3

For an agile project: Focus on testing as a very iterative on-going, highly integrated process. High number of testers at the start may be more reflective of a more traditional approach. Remember that the goal is higher quality, not number of tests Be careful in having 'initial testers' and later a base of testers that you'd replenish. This sounds like ...


3

Although this question has been asked two years ago, it is still a current topic. Regarding payment; money does not really affect the motivation of people (see: Harvard Review ) So I wouldn't raise salary just to motivate people.. But based from our projects experience we faced the same situation as you. We got unmotivated testers. Hence we reflected the ...


3

You and your team cannot .... I repeat, simply cannot afford to have testers low on motivation. You can probably have lesser talented testers, high in morale and eagerness... but you just can't have people who are not motivated enough! Period! Poorly motivated period think negatively and their negativity can rub off on other resources. This will impact ...


2

Make them co-stars Frequently application developers are considered the 'stars' and get the fame and money and recognition. Quality Engineers, whether manual or automated are seen as second class citizens. Your title says "deal with testers". That is a red flag. How do you 'deal' with application engineers is a different question. Currently there is a ...


2

There are a few challenges to the situation that you are raising. First, there is no official thing called waterscrum, so there are no rules for doing it. Generally, Waterscrum or WaterScrumfall are derogatory terms referring to poor Scrum practice. Therefor, we should be approaching each quality practice in the context of their value by themselves, not ...


2

I expect that your remote testers see their job the way it is defined for nearly all the organizations that use them: does the software work? and can they sign off on that and get paid? If you create an arrangement where their pay and employment is dependent on giving much greater feedback it will happen, though you'll need to invest time and training ...


2

In our previous project we had the same issue. Since we are running agile methods I will try to explain our lessons which we made. What we did: Exploratory testing methods. Means that we do testing while learning things that influenced our testing procuedure. Within this methods we used also the tool Tricentis (or former called QASymphony). With each ...


1

TBH this doesn't come from the culture characteristics, if so: Indians are some of the most unaccepting of many cultures that i have worked with. From my past experiences with Clients (Having managed many QA offshore teams) The problem here is the way we work in Agile(Mostly) It is highly results-oriented where all the teams(not just QA) are focused on ...


1

This doesn't have anything to do with cultural differences. It's the issue with the organization's work culture. To fix this , you have to ask yourself some hard questions. How independent is the test team What are the KPI used to validate QA efficiency Is bug count and defect detection ratio could be considered as KPIs Does testers get appreciated and ...


1

I'm not sure about this. the part where devs and testers are having "tension" are so year 2005... anyway to give my personal opinions How do you avoid tensions in the processes? respect is the key How can the testers be better integrated into the processes? Include the testers in all plannings, meetings or just anything that involves their opinions ...


1

From my point of view, intelligent manual testers are way more productive and important than test automation engineers. Why? Test automation is better done by the software developers themselves, in form of ... Unit tests Integration tests UI automation tests Tests + Bugs from the point of view of an actual user usually are way more important than any ...


1

Interesting topic, I think I can see something similar in the company I work for. BUT... ... how do you really know they are not motivated? It's easy to use your assumptions and just rely on that. I'm in fact suggesting you should talk about that with them, they might have an interesting input as well :) If it really turns out they are not motivated, the ...


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