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5

If the "development side of the house" is already using TFS, then you would be crazy to consider HPQC. Both HPQC and TFS use per seat licensing, and you will have to pay double. TFS is a true ALM solution that includes source control, developer work item tracking, build support and everything that the developers need to do their jobs, and in the later ...


3

TFS=Team Foundation Server. All things microsoft that require storage and integration get run through this. VS=Visual Studio. All things that are "visualized" are pushed through this. MTM=Microsoft Test manager. This manages all tests. So with this then TFS stores everything and synchronizes it. VS is a method to visualize things in order to interact ...


3

You may want to look at TFS 2012. It now has a Kanban board in the tool. There is a preview version of the TFS service in the cloud available if you want to check it out. When I looked into it for TFS 2010, I was only able to find free Kanban tools that did not link to TFS, or paid ones like Urban Turtle that could actually integrate with TFS 2010.


2

Probably the biggest benefit you'd get from this is if you have the automated test routines linked to TFS Test Cases (managed in MS Test Manager). That will give you automatic reporting of your test cases via Microsoft's test harnesses, complete with results in the MS format (since I'm presuming you'd be running your tests via MSTest.exe) With a command ...


2

This was the second link on Google on TFS migration. The instructions seem fairly complete and straight forward. Good luck.


1

MS has several command line tools that will run tests. There's more information about how to use them and how to choose the tool you use on the MSDN site: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms182486.aspx I'd suggest reading the documentation and experimenting with the different tools to decide which of the tools works best for your situation.


1

The short answer is "yes". Some of the places you can look are Microsoft's Channel9 site, in the TechEd presentations. Some that I know are particularly useful are: Microsoft Test Manager - http://channel9.msdn.com/Events/TechEd/NorthAmerica/2013/DEV-B327#fbid=P-tUCSTcUQ5 Visual Studio Premium or higher includes the install for MTM. This video covers ...


1

TFS now has a REST API that you can engage with. There are some sample queries that you can perhaps find out the information you want here.


1

If you have VS/TFS in house already, use the skills in the teams to help you set it up. Whilst QC is completely customisable, it is not real easy to customise the items you want My company historically bought QC back when there was a central test team across the whole group, and it worked well. Since restructuring the test teams have all kept with QC, but ...


1

If you're already using TFS in-house it makes a lot more sense to use the Microsoft toolset for ALM and issue tracking (although I'd look at upgrading to 2013 - TFS management has been made a lot easier compared to 2010, and builds the testing side into the web interface) That said, Microsoft Test Manager is (in my view) more geared to manual testing ...


1

You've actually answered your own question here: In Test Manager you put in a build you want to test against. So now all those test runs are tied to the build TFS is designed so that there must be a build associated to a test run. In order to keep test results but not the build itself, you have a couple of options: Create a "dummy" build to run tests ...


1

We used to use TFS Workbench before we upgraded to TFS 2012. Its a Windows based application but used to work well.


1

You might take a look at this project on Codeplex for a WIP board that you could use in as a Kanban board. It appears to be process agnostic. It does not appear to have moved out of Beta 2 so I am not sure what the level of stability is or if it is getting any work done on it any longer. It does integrate with TFS 2010 though. Visual WIP http://visualwip....


1

Perhaps no link with TFS, but consider to use Trello: it's free and worth it!


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