Hot answers tagged

16

Assuming you exclude the systems used to execute the application-under-test (Operating System, Browser, etc) there are no tools a tester cannot live without. There are many tools that make testing stronger, more thorough, easier, faster, and/or more efficient. We use bug tracking tools, text reading/editing/printing tools, document storage and retrieval ...


10

Some additional tools to the others (+1 to Phil and Joe, great suggestions) mentioned: Mind Mapping tool (e.g. XMind) Database Querying/Scripting tool (e.g. SQL Server Management Studio) Screenshot Capturing tool (e.g. PicPick, windows problem step recorder) Data Generation tool (e.g. www.generatedata.com) Notepad++ Browser specific dev tool bars (e.g. ...


9

Disclaimer: We are the authors of Sahi, and this answers the original post and the next answer by Tarken. This is of course biased, but I hope in a sense of fairness this will not be removed :) Hi Steve Miskiewicz, you should definitely check out Sahi. Don't be worried about the blogs and online presence. The problem space of web automation is small. You ...


9

Jing (Screens capturing tools) Small little tool that let's you record a short video of the screen. I personally use this when taking screenshots or attempting to explain an issue becomes difficult. The next best thing is to record the problem. It also saves the clip on the cloud so you don't have to worry about finding a location to host the video. ...


9

There are many ways to expend the knowledge as a QA: Read QA blogs. Read Testing books. Hone your QA skills by teaching others. Go to Meet-Up & grow your network. Search & Read the Research Papers. Go to the Conference & Company Seminar. One of the best ways to learn Ask Q/A on Stack Exchange sites. Work on Open Source /Crowd Testing Projects. (...


8

Some ideas for the GPS part, based on my experience testing GPS's: Do field tests, and choose you locations wisely- from totally open skies to crowded tall buildings with limited to no GPS reception, from standing still to driving slow and fast, change heights during the tests (GPS is less accurate in reporting heights), choose different times of day, ...


8

I'm not sure what kind of advice you are looking for. You said "here's a lack of quick (not more than 8-10 hrs) and easily available tasks for staff evaluation. It would be nice to have 5-10 typical testing apps for checking various aspects of QA specialist skills". Other than "Create them", I'm not sure what kind of advice we can offer? I've created "...


8

I'll try not to repeat any of the tools already listed. Some that I use extensively that I don't see in other answers are: Fiddler - http debugging proxy Beyond Compare - diffing tool for files or folders Perfmon, Filemon, Processmon - monitoring different parts of the SUT. Snipping Tool - screenshots


8

There are several tools for the AI Driven Testing (AI-DT). here is the list of few tool they have some trial version period but not sure about the open source. Endtest Ghost Inspector Testim Tesabot EvoSuite ReTest functionize AppDiff


7

This is a very good question... why ISN'T Sahi more common? When I was evaluating tools a few years back I first tried Selenium RC and liked the overall nature of the tool but found, in my experience, in all honesty, it just didn't work. It didn't work well with IE (a deal-breaker for many) and was way too flakey (tests often failed for no reason, hung on ...


7

I think your suggestions are very good, it is always good to have clear guidelines. Though they should not be set in stone and should be used as a guideline and not as a rule. Full-screen In order to reproduce the issue I want as much information as possible. A screenshot can tell a thousand words. Some people make only a screenshot of the part they think ...


7

First of all, I doubt that there is currently something like AI-driven testing. *-driven means that your entire development/testing process strongly relies on *. Working for retest myself, I'm convinced—due to my experience there—that AI can be a great help to complement traditional testing approaches. But: Today's AI is inferior to hand-crafted test scripts ...


6

I think it is because Sahi Open Source offers only a very limitied functionality compared to other free tools/api's like Selenium. Sahi Pro costs USD 495! for functionality that you get from other tools for free like taking screenshots or grid.


6

Use whatever you are comfortable with. I'd suggest starting with something basic for recording notes like Notepad++. The important thing is to be able to keep detailed notes about your session, to setup a session charter, etc. Once you've got some practice with it, you can see what works and what doesn't. I've used Rapid Reporter and Session Tester as ...


6

IMHO, a team lead who is a developer with less knowledge in testing, is the wrong kind of person to be selecting a test tool. Do you have any QA Professionals on your team - perhaps someone with test tool experience? Or, lacking that do you have anyone on the team who will actually be tasked with using a test tool? I would suggest you turn to them. If ...


6

I'd suggest you start with the software quality blogs and forums around the Internet. Some of the online portals I like are: Joe Strazzere's All Things Quality The Software Testing Club portal (they have a pretty good forum, too) The Ministry of Testing portal (their listing of tools is long and could use more detail, but has a lot of information condensed ...


6

Yes, that would be awesome, but there is no such tool. (If you are very ambitious, you can try writing it yourself.) The reality of cross-platform UI automation is that it is brittle and requires a lot of maintenance. Any vendor who claims otherwise is more interested in taking your money than solving your problems. Here are some alternatives: Hire ...


6

In this context, a goal you most likely want to achieve is one of Continuous Integration (CI). To that end, from the developer side, every check-in will trigger a build (to perform certain checks and see if it passes). Then you will usually have a nightly build that gives you an up-to-date test environment every morning. Now, this pipeline should include ...


5

I believe Fiddler could be used to assist in the scenario you provided. Check it out at http://www.fiddler2.com/fiddler2/


5

I can suggest you Appium is the best tool for Android & iOS mobile testing. I'm working on appium from last 6 months in my organization. The main advantages of using Appium is: cross-platform Backend is Selenium so you will get all selenium functionality Able to test iOS and Android Continuous integration support Doesn't require access to your source ...


5

I've used lots of different tools - some commercial, some open-source, some home-grown - for test automation. I usually use a mix of such tools in my overall automation efforts. Over the years, I have found some nice-to-have features and attributes that I end up looking for, or building, as I assemble a new Test Automation Suite. Some of these attributes ...


5

Not saying that it's cheap, but, tools like OneNote tend to fill this void very well. We use a notebook for each application. For projects, we use Tabs/Sections for Modules/areas, and for operational type changes, we use a new section for each Release. Each session takes up 1 page. These get stored on either a sharepoint or in a shared folder that we all ...


5

You might think my answer is snarky but my brain, notebook and pen is pretty much all I need I do use other tools but none I consider 'essential'


5

One more important thing people forget communication tools, a tester should always ask questions, so we need some communication tools like Hipchat, Skype, slack, whatsapp...etc or any client email tool. + Clipboard Manager is very useful tool for multiple copy history.


5

There are no tools that can provide you client-side rendering times. Client side rendering is not a measurable value, unless all of the devices accessing the system are identical in terms of hardware and network access to the SUT. However, It is completely viable to do a stopwatch test of the total page rendering time, as long as you communicate to the ...


5

The key challenge is getting control of either: the thing that triggers action requests. the clock by which the system determines what time it is. The other answers (and your question) have already mentioned the first possibility, so I'll focus on the second. When I design systems like this, I try to arrange for the clock to be substitutable. For the ...


5

I think you want to pick the framework which has the most active development and the most documentation resources on the internet. Of-course you first need to check which framework fits your requirements, I would pilot all for a short while (starting with the most active one. If you have multiple candidates.) Which is more popular: Number of (recent) ...


5

I find MITM proxies and Mocks/Stubbing to be the most advanced pieces of Technology in Automated Checking. By using these, it makes it far easier to: Create repeatable, consistent checks Decrease overall execution speed Segregate the application into logical pieces Record executed manual tests But for the real answer, QA's knowledge and senses is the most ...


5

Test open source software and report defects on Github. Maybe start with the top open source applications, you might already be using some. Try to answers questions here on SQA.SE. If you cannot answer them do research (and create a proof of concept) until you can. This helped me greatly. Read testing blogs Read testing books My personal opinion is that ...


4

Try Wink, it's very light because it captures a screenshot on each click or keystroke. You can export to PDF for printing or make it a Flash video. It works on all Windows versions, recorded projects tend to grow huge.


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