5

in Jmeter, for a thread group, the number of thread users is 20, ramp-up period is 5s, the loop count is 10,

so what is the concurrent users in this situation.

6

Please see the following link:

http://jmeter.apache.org/usermanual/test_plan.html#thread_group

The 'number of threads' are equivalent to the number of concurrent users that you are looking for. In your scenario above, you have 20 concurrent threads (users) and each thread will run 10 times.

5

It depends on what your test is doing. If it's something long enough - it will be 20, if it's something very short - it'll be 1.

JMeter offers several options to control the load. In particular the most commonly used elemends are:

Also JMeter concurrent threads are not "concurrent users" as real-life people do pauses between actions on web pages. If you don't set any pauses in your tests then 20 concurrent threads will stand for something like 200-250 concurrent users.

5

'Also JMeter concurrent threads are not "concurrent users" as real-life people do pauses between actions on web pages. If you don't set any pauses in your tests then 20 concurrent threads will stand for something like 200-250 concurrent users.'

Yes, I am in an argument with a client about this fact. They are thinking 50 Threads = 50 Users. But there are no thread delays in the tests. This in no way then represents 50 Users. I wish Jmeter didn't put the (users) in brackets when configuring threads - as they are not the same thing. I went back to the client, I profiled the web logs, and I averaged out 15 second delays. I reran the test with these delays....this reduced the response times by 70%.

It's a very important point and can affect the results significantly.

  • to make one thread more like a user you can add waits (constant timer) in-between your requests. If you use a user variable then you can configure it globally instead of having to update each individual timer – Steve Apr 25 '17 at 10:09
-1

1 concurrent user.

5 ramup second / 20 thread = 0.25.

every user starts action at the interval of 0.25 second

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