4

I fully agree with your answer.


3

Your understanding is incomplete and your example is misleading. Equivalence partitioning does not divide inputs into two categories only, e.g. valid and invalid. It can divide inputs into as many classes as you see fit, e.g. Valid inputs that are too big Valid inputs that are big valid inputs that are common Invalid inputs that are common Invalid inputs ...


2

The answer depends on perspective. If you want to only unit test this function, then you're on the right track with your example equivalence classes you have defined. Although, you are missing some. I'd recommended using boundary value analysis technique in addition to equivalence partitions -- these 2 techniques often go hand-in-hand. If you stick with ...


2

Based on my experience in quality assurance services there can be few more ways to cover test cases: We can derive the test cases directly from a requirements. Various Techniques are following: Boundary Value Analysis (BVA) Equivalence Partitioning (EP) Decision Table Testing State Transition Diagrams Use Case Testing Another way to create test cases is ...


2

Yes, it is possible to use test design techniques to test edge and corner cases. Boundary Value Analysis (BVA) and Equivalence Partitioning (EP) are useful for testing input data to verify the output results. For these to be valuable, you need to understand what the boundaries are and how the data is partitioned between the boundaries. For more thorough ...


1

Easy, 1 user with different/multiple loanAccountTypes. Now, all snarkyness aside, you should not expect this to be a forum to get your work done by other people. We can help with it, give pointers, feedback to something you have done, but not do it for you completely. Consider this an exercise, come back with your own solution and we can give a ...


1

You will have three possible outputs: True: this will depend on both X and Y. You can pick boundary values for X => { -1, 0, 1 } and its associated values for Y. You do the same for Y => {-1, 0, 1}. False: The same as above, but the "associated" value should yield a False result. Invalid: It seems to me that the only way to raise an exception is to ...


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