8

It depends. Assuming that you're working in a US environment (the zip code being in US format) and that your application specifications don't call out whether or not a zip 5+4 should be accepted: I'd report this as a bug if: Your specifications/user stories call for any or all valid US zip codes to be accepted (this is an implicit requirement to accept ...


4

Let me add my options There are some addons installed or not installed in DEV/QA browser There are networking or routing specific which makes client calls from DEV go to different resources (e.g. hosts file configuration) and that could impact if your UI is built with the help of Ajax requests There are different locale settings or time settings on client ...


4

If you don't have specific requirements you should design test cases based on best practices, best user experience and security. It's not a bug, because it does not behave differently from expectations (you don't have any) but allowing to create password that is weak may lead to account hijacking and information leakage which is an issue. You have to think ...


3

You want to iterate over the rows of the table and verify if the text you are looking for is present. Once you locate the 'table' element you can do something like this in Java: public boolean isRegistered(String patientID) { for(WebElement row : table.findElements(By.tagName("tr"))) { if(row.getText().contains(patientID)) { return ...


3

There is no one standard industry "norm" people have to adhere to. Coincidentally, I recently had a XML validation experience myself. As a tester, I was working in an Agile team for 8 weeks. The project we were working on required cooperation from two external development teams, both of which located in a different city. A XML file was what we used to ...


3

Your understanding is incomplete and your example is misleading. Equivalence partitioning does not divide inputs into two categories only, e.g. valid and invalid. It can divide inputs into as many classes as you see fit, e.g. Valid inputs that are too big Valid inputs that are big valid inputs that are common Invalid inputs that are common Invalid inputs ...


3

I think you have several directions you can potentially take here, based on the information you've given, but all of them require a degree of modification to standard unit testing structures. Some unit test frameworks allow you to identify a data source and will run a given test once per record. If these read each record one at a time, this will work for ...


2

I don't know how much my answer will be useful for you; but Yes, we do use the same for testing parts of our applications that work in back-end e.g. we use it for testing webservices response, Database testing and currently we are using it for ETL testing too. For example: Given: CSV file to be imported is located at xyz location When: ETL process A ...


2

It is definitely a bug, unless your requirements mention that ZIP extension should be ignored. So talk to your customer how to handle it. One possibility is to silently strip the extension if you don't need it.


2

As there are to many characters to test them all. You need to think about how many cases you need to safe-guard. I think only two cases are needed to document the behavior one with special characters one without special characters I would try a couple different characters and combinations when doing exploratory testing sessions, but not create test-...


2

It depends on your testing objectives, the number of verifications you can do to a website is infinite. We have no background knowledge about your project so it is hard for us to understand what "common assertions" are. Having said that, my personal opinions are: Verify each page title, header (normally h1). Verify if key elements are present, such as ...


2

From the testing point of view you can't keep running a test suite to verify if at anytime there is any 404 pages come then it should trigger a mail. 404 error shows when the client was able to communicate with a given server, but the server could not find what was requested.(which may occurs because huge load or missing sources) I would suggest that ask ...


2

Since you don't have guidelines, you would have trouble justifying the behavior of the password field as a bug. That said, I'd suggest you raise a bug and classify it as a security flaw. You can cite the OWASP security standards password section to justify your case, even if the application isn't a web app: any software that needs a password by definition ...


2

0-switch coverage is basically the testing for each valid transition. Since you don't have loops, you simply count the number of arrows. 1-switch coverage relates to the number of pairs of valid transitions. E.g., "3 -> 2 -> 1" is a pair of valid transitions. On the other hand, "3 -> 2 -> 4" and "3 -> 1 -> (whatever)" are not valid because you can't perform ...


1

Looks like you are missing TagSoup in your classpath. As it is stated here you should have one to be able to successfully import html format. Since html is often not a well-formed XML, it should be pre-processed before importing. When one does not have TagSoup the input format is considered as XML and has to be well-formed. Your example is missing closing &...


1

If all you need to do is check whether a particular string is on a page (in any element/field, as if you would use the "find" function in browser), you can do it in Selenium with Python using XPath for locating the element: # locating the element text_xpath = "//*[contains(text(), '$THE_STRING_YOU_ARE_LOOKING_FOR')]" webdriver.get($URL_OF_THE_PAGE) ...


1

There is also option in defect tracking tools for comments by developers. When developer rejects some defect on defect tracking tool, he also mention his or her comments there. You can read that for the reason of rejecting. Then you can personally discuss with the developer. Often it happens that a defect coming on your pc does not happen in developer pcs. ...


1

Don't use selenium for something like this, the overhead from carrying a browser with you doesn't benefit you in anyway and just eats up ram. I'm not going into the question if something like this makes sense since it's a client requirement and it's not a QA job to argue about this. Just set up a daemon that sends out requests to the pages and check the ...


1

I think you have to pass it the HTML spec or also it does not understand the format. -N n="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" Also see this question for some examples: https://stackoverflow.com/questions/22021494/how-to-xmlstarlet-to-extract-html-data-by-id


1

I prefer to ask for forgiveness than to ask for permission and many companies and managers share this principle although not always admit that openly. If there's something innovative to be tried where it is hard to convince people upfront to support something I've learned it's better to try it myself or within a small group. If it worked for you it will be ...


1

I have found another solution by using Burp proxy tool that helped me to bypass JS validation on a client, intercept the request that has been sent to the server, alter it and forward back to server. That way I was able to test exactly what I needed.


1

I would use a freeware tool like loopback to test client-side JavaScript. The error needs to be generated on the server-side so create a toy localhost server to send canned responses back to the browser. Learning loopback shouldn't be that hard; something for a Saturday afternoon.


1

Background: We typically call this type of testing (or technique) equivalence class or equivalence class partitioning. In a nutshell equivalence class partitioning means certain groups of input or stored data are treated the same by the program. We can break these equivalent values into groups and select a few from each group to test with. Each test is ...


1

Why don't you try using regular expression. So, Sample regular expression can be: ([v,i,d,e,o,V,I,D,E,O])\w+ One regular expression should identify all combinations. P.S: Regular expression given about is not really accurate. But as per answer to your question. Regular expression is batter way to handle this.


1

@Agree to Yu. I will use following approach: We have text If its with special characters we can verify : text.contains("special_char_which_you_wanted_to_chk") When above case 1 failed - Means your string doesn't contains special characters Note - You need to verify all special characters in loop if more in numbers


1

epubcheck will assess whether your file conforms to the epub standards. It doesn't care about your content or your formatting, as long as it conforms to the epub standards. An epub file mostly a static web site compressed into zip format (plus some additional metadata). So: You could unzip the content in a directory and use Selenium to examine the HTML ...


1

I haven't done this, but since epubcheck has a CLI & java library, you could incorporate the library with WebDriver & do the validation that way. The wiki has an example of how to use it as a library.


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